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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Mon Aug 25, 2014 1:10 pm

It was a great scenario and I echo Stefan's comments about the uniforms and flags. I was a way east of Dunker Church near the end and I knew that was behind our lines and I was very worried whena grey-clad unit was seen marching there! It was in the woods and I couldn't see the flag so for a while I was concerned Stefan's position had been outflanked.

I saw the completely transparent toolbar Stefan mentions when I clicked on a certain rebel unit's flag.



I think the Antietam maps have normal fatigue penalties for obstacles, its just that there are a lot of them. I too marched via the roads for the start of the game but from the North Bridge to the Dunker church I marched the direct route straight across country and my regts and guns were still 'fresh' when they arrived. One was 'okay' but earlier I'd caught that one doing the dreaded fence walk. As I mentioned in another post somewhere I take every opportunity to rest my troops whenever I can, I never run them and if I can halt for a while after a march before going straight into combat it helps.

Perhaps its the combat that's tiring the men more? They are completely raw in this scenario.

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"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Martin on Mon Aug 25, 2014 1:47 pm

Yes I could create a sequel if there's sufficient interest.  Maybe if we take it forward a week or two, they'll be a chance to give the troops a week or two more training  Smile

The main purpose of last night's game (at least in my mind) was to fill a sudden gap in the scenario schedule, and to test out the new mod.  Thanks for the comments about the mod from you both.  I'll look into them.  I was just relieved that it didn't crash!

[I should mention that it's ultimately our intention to incorporate this in an expanded CouriersAndMaps mod, so you will only need on mod for ACW, you know everyone has it, and there's no concerns about getting them in the right order etc.  If you like, it will be an equivalent to the KS Nappy mod]

I do agree re the Antietam map and fatigue.  It might be more than the fences, as I find the same effect on the South Mountain maps too.  Anyway, I think Kevin is planning to make some improvements in the new expanded CouriersAndMaps.

Martin (J)

PS I'm going to post both sides' briefings shortly, plus a brief summary of the battle.

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Martin on Mon Aug 25, 2014 3:32 pm

BEAUREGARD'S GAMBIT

Union briefing for Major General Robert Patterson, Commander 1st Corps


We have reports that at least two rebel divisions of uncertain strength are across the Potomac, at some point so far unknown, probably by means of a pontoon bridge.   Loyal citizens report that Holmes' Division (estd at 6,000) is also marching NE towards the Potomac on the Virginia side.

Reports are so far unclear, but General Kheim's pickets have encountered enemy infantry from Jackson's division to the W of Dunker Church.  A rather flustered citizen also reports that Longstreet is in Sharpsburg.



It must be admitted that Beauregard has got the drop on us.  Not only is our main force still around Washington, but even your own forces in the Valley are somewhat dispersed.

Thanks goodness McDowell had the wit to order Hunter's 2nd Division back to your command.  However Hunter's force is itself strung-out, marching N on the east side of Antietam Creek.

It is unclear what Beauregard's intentions are.  It may be to secure the town of Sharpsburg, and use it as a rallying point for the disaffected in Maryland.  Regrettably, the latter appear to be numerous.  Another possibility is that he intends to make a thrust to the Baltimore & Ohio Railway, 5 miles off-map  to the NE. This is the main link between the eastern Union states and the midwest.  A third is that he intends to defeat your force and then march SE on Washington.


Union Order of Battle
Total ( 14'837 inf , '269 cav , '34 guns )

1st Corps : Maj Gen Robert Patterson

6th Division : Maj Gen George Cadwallader ( 3'358 inf , '269 cav , '10 guns )
1st Brigade : Col William B Franklin ( 1'429 inf )
2nd Brigade : Col Andrew Porter ( 1'929 inf )
3rd Cavalry Brigade : Capt  J H McCarthur ( '269 cav )
4th Battery : Capt J H Carlisle ( '4 guns )
5th Battery : Capt Samuel Best ( '6 guns )

2nd Division : Maj Gen William High Kheim ( 5'520 inf , '12 guns )
1st Brigade : Col Ambrose E Burnside ( 2'020 inf )
2nd Brigade : Col Orlando Willcox ( 1'896 inf )
3rd Brigade : Col T A Rowley ( 1'604 inf )
4th Battery : Capt Charles Bookwood ( '6 guns )
5th Battery : Capt Lytton De Vries ( '6 guns )

3rd Division : Col David Hunter ( 5'959 inf , '12 guns )
1st Brigade : Brig Gen Robert Schenk ( 1'973 inf )
2nd Brigade : Col A J Johnson ( 2'017 inf )
3rd Brigade : Col Leopold von Gilsa ( 1'969 inf )
4th Battery : Capt Charles Griffin ( '6 guns )
5th Battery : Capt J B Ricketts ( '6 guns )


Confederate briefing for Pierre G T Beauregard

You crossed the Potomac earlier today by means of a pontoon bridge a half mile W of Snyder Farm.
Your fine plan appears to have totally surprised the Union commanders, but poor implementation has lost you precious time.  You expected to have all 4 of your divisions across the Potomac by now, but poor staff-work and slow marching means that you only have Longstreet's, Jackson's and Bonham's Divisions on this side of the river, with Holmes' Division of 6,000 still approaching the river on the Virginia side.  This should still give you a handy superiority over the Patterson's Union 1st Corps (estimated at c10,000), as most of their troops are still believed to be with McDowell around Washington.



Your intention was to secure the town of Sharpsburg, which was believed to be Patterson's main supply depot for the whole region.  However some of Longstreet's pickets have entered the town, and found nothing there! It had been hoped too, that many Marylander's would rally to your banners, but so far that hasn't happened either!

It's all rather embarrassing, as you have taken a grave risk with this operation, by stripping most troops from Manassas, and crossing the Potomac into enemy-held territory.  You must clearly do something, but what? One possibility is to move NE and disrupt the Baltimore & Ohio Railway.  This is the main link between the eastern Union states and the midwest.  Another possibility is to defeat Patterson's small force and then move SE on Washington.


Confederate Order of Battle
Total ( 15'739 inf , '629 cav , '26 guns )

Confederate Army : Maj Gen Pierre G T Beauregard

1st Division : Brig Gen Milledge Luke Bonham ( 4'208 inf , '629 cav , '8 guns )
Corse's Brigade : Col Montgomery Dent Corse ( 2'027 inf )
Bee's Brigade : Brig Gen Barnard Elliott Bee ( 2'181 inf )
McDonald's Cavalry : Col Angus William McDonald ( '629 cav )
Latham's Battery : Capt H G Latham ( '4 guns )
Rosser's Battery : Capt Tom L Rosser ( '4 guns )

2nd Division : Brig Gen James G Longstreet ( 5'383 inf , '8 guns )
Cocke's Brigade : Col Philip St. George Cocke ( 2'096 inf )
Jones' Brigade : Brig Gen David Rumph Jones ( 1'548 inf )
Ewell's Brigade : Brig Gen Richard Ewell ( 1'739 inf )
Shields' Battery : Capt J C Shields ( '4 guns )
Staunton Artillery : Capt John D Imboden ( '4 guns )

3rd Division : Brig Gen Thomas J Jackson ( 6'148 inf , '10 guns )
Bartow's Brigade : Col Francis S Bartow ( 2'133 inf )
Early's Brigade : Col Jubal A Early ( 1'926 inf )
Holmes' Brigade : Brig Gen Theophilus Holmes ( 2'089 inf )
Loudoun Artillery : Capt Arthur L Rogers ( '6 guns )
Alexandria Artillery : Capt Del Kemper ( '4 guns )


What actually happened

The Confederates had about 1,000 more men than the Union, but also had the burden of the offence with a green force.  The ball was very much in Beauregard's court, and he decided to concentrate his forces to attack Kheim's union division on the heights S of Dunker Church, whilst sending one of Longstreet's brigades to seize a bridge over Antietam Creek, to facilitate a subsequent advance SE on Washington

The heights were a strong position, but Union forces were widely spread, and the Confederate plan might have worked.  Unfortunately it took the raw troops a long time to get into position, particularly Bonham's Division which started well to the rear.  There was also some uncertainty as to where Bonham was to deploy. Should this be on Jackson's left of on his right?  Bonham's final approach then had to be cross-country, which further fatigued his men.  

A coordinated attack was finally launched an hour into the game, but it soon emerged that the Union forces were by now too strong, and Beauregard called off the attack after Jackson's Division suffered heavy losses. This was probably a wise decision.

Longstreet had taken the required bridge over Antietam Creek and Bonham's division was ordered into Sharpsburg to secure the town, preparatory to an advance SE the next day with all four Confederate divisions.  

Meanwhile the Union launched their own attack against the weakened Jackson.  It was about this time that General Beauregard was shot, although it remains as yet unclear whether this was by the enemy, his own men, or a jealous husband.  Command devolved upon General Longstreet.

As dusk fell, the Union right drove Jackson towards the Rebel LOC back to their pontoon bridge over the Potomac.  With one more hour of daylight, they could well have taken the bridge and cut off the Confederates on the wrong side of the major river.



Whilst the Rebs still held the pontoon bridge at dusk, and would have been able to bring across their fourth division overnight, their forces would now have been strung out over a wide frontage, and under threat from a concentrated Union force, which itself could be quickly reinforced by means of the Baltimore & Ohio Railway.

The Union suffered 239 casualties and the Rebs 861.  The latter also lost about 2,000 stragglers, mainly from Jackson's battered division.  Union stragglers were only a few hundred.  Interestingly, the Confederate overall loss was not dissimilar to that suffered by the defeated Union army at 1st Bull Run.

Overall therefore, I think this was a clear Union victory.  Although the newly-arriving Reb division would enable them to stabilise the position the following morning, part of the Confederate army would still be disorganised.  With large potential Union reinforcements arriving by train later in the day, it would be necessary for the Confederate army to pull back over the Potomac during the afternoon.

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Mon Aug 25, 2014 7:53 pm

Good report Martin. One of this scenario's strong points was it was never clear what the enemy (the Rebs) were doing or planning to do so we had to keep an eye on various possibilities. Luckily for us they came to us and battered against us, but we did miss the brigade that had taken the Lower Bridge. I rode over to make sure the Middle Bridge wasn't threatened and was pleased to see all quiet there but I never thought to check the Lower Bridge!

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"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  MajorByrd on Mon Aug 25, 2014 8:44 pm

I did not order you Stefan, I suggested. =)
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Uncle Billy on Tue Aug 26, 2014 2:12 am

August 24th, 1861
Sharpsburg, Maryland

Honorable Secretary of War, Leroy Walker
Sir,

It is my most unfortunate duty to report the events leading to the slight reversal of our fortunes in the just concluded battle. I must point out that the men fought gallantly and our lack of success was in no way of their making. Rather, the fault can be placed squarely at the feet of our commander, General Beauregard. The man was drunk. I have questioned his staff closely, and they all agree on the following train of events. The previous night, the general, fully confident of our certain victory the next day, set out on what can only be described as an epic night of debauchery. He visited no less than three fancy houses and careened through every publick house in the town.

Such behavior, though reprehensible, could have been forgiven, had he pulled himself together the next morning and afternoon. Instead, his staff reports the the general had lost his nerve and talked of disaster befalling the army this day. With a cowardly disposition so evident, General Beauregard once again took to the bottle. As the battle heated up, the general was seen riding in a most careless matter through the ranks of General Jackson's division yelling, "Tallyho, onward the light brigade!" Clearly John Barleycorn held the reins of this battle. General Jackson, outraged at this lack of gentlemanly demeanor and the sight of the destruction of his division due to the commanders shouts, drew his pistol and fired.

Contrary to rumor, the ball missed its target. For at that moment, the commander's horse reared and headed for the rear, all the while the general was shouting for a certain Daphne to, "apply the riding crop." Most execrable, sir. His horse carried him all the way to the Potomac where a sudden halt dumped our commander unceremoniously into the water. Apparently his horse was done with him too. With reluctance, a corporal dragged the general out of the water and set him under a shade tree. As the soldier was attempting to make General Beauregard comfortable, the general reached around and laid hands on the corporal's backside while croaking, "Give us a kiss." The corporal had to be restrained from doing murder this day.

I reluctantly relay these facts to you, sir. If we are to prevail in this unpleasantness, we must have leaders of sufficient fiber to not succumb to drink and weak nerve before the enemy. I recommend that General Beauregard be reassigned to a less demanding post. Perhaps a billet in the west could be found. Nothing of importance will likely occur in that theater.

I remain your obedient servant,

Brigadier General, James Longstreet, acting commander, Army of the Potomac

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Tue Aug 26, 2014 9:54 am

To Brig.Gn. J. Longstreet,
Sharpsburg,
Maryland



Richmond,
Virginia,
25th Aug.

General,

Your letter of yesterday has raised much concern here in the capital. The War Dept. is looking into these allegations and has recalled Gen's Jackson, Bonham, your good self and a number of officers serving on Gen. Beauregard's staff to answer at an interview here. We have also asked after the whereabouts of the infamous "kissing corporal" but none has voluntered to come forward. Given this, we are reluctant to accept all the details of your letter of the 24th inst. as true and an investigation shall be put in motion.

Meanwhile where is your report of any actual fighting?

Yrs,
Leroy Walker
Secty. of War

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"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Uncle Billy on Tue Aug 26, 2014 2:12 pm

Leroy Walker wrote:Meanwhile where is your report of any actual fighting?
Veni, vidi, but not so much vici.

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Martin on Wed Sep 03, 2014 5:05 pm

I've been meaning to post about a couple of aspects re artillery in the recent early ACW game:

1.  Jack felt that the Confederate artillery was seriously underpowered, even for virtually untrained troops.  I did give most of the Union batteries somewhat better experience, as about 2/3rd of them were regular batteries.  Now I don't actually know how well trained these units were in August 1861, but I was aware that relatively few enlisted men went south, unlike the officers.  So at least they weren't starting from such a low base.  Did any other players have a view on artillery effectiveness in the game?

2.  There was some comment (by Sven?) that the artillery is just too difficult to capture.  Having witnessed his attempts to overrun one of Jackson's batteries, I have to agree!  I think Kevin is planning to make some changes to CouriersAndMaps, which will limit the ability of individual unlimbered guns to turn on a sixpence.  I think I have read somewhere that the game does not allow limbered guns to be captured, however.  That does not seem right to me, but I'm not sure if it can be changed.  Kevin?

Martin (J)


Last edited by Martin on Wed Sep 03, 2014 11:16 pm; edited 2 times in total

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Wed Sep 03, 2014 8:44 pm

I don't know if Kevin altered something significant for the Nap mod but limbered guns can be captured there - one of the siege guns was taken by the Spanish at Barcelona and I know for a fact they were not unlimbered because they had 0 ammunition and a gun will remain limbered when it runs out of ammo.

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"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Artillery Time

Post  WSH Baylor on Thu Sep 04, 2014 1:34 am

Actually, Martin, the guns during the Civil War could be turned quite rapidly! Personally, I have lifted the trail of a 10 Pdr. Parrott single-handedly and pivoted it 180 degrees in a manner of seconds during a demo at Antietam National Battlefield Park.

Additionally, when firing canister, it is only necessary during an emergency to "aim" in the general direction, much like shooting quail.

One final thought: Many Southern units were organized prior to the start of the war including several artillery units who practiced with state-issued artillery guns. Most were antiquated but, nevertheless, provided the essence of artillery drill fundamentals. Granted, they were not on the same level of gun quality and training as the regular Federals, but were not all "untrained". For example, one 4-gun battery that supported the First Virginia Brigade (later known as the Stonewall Brigade) were the guns from Virginia Military Academy in Lexington, VA, and were painted red! I believe these were all 6-pdrs.

Jack
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Martin on Thu Sep 04, 2014 11:48 am

Both fair points, Jack.  

Re the swivelling guns, I should have been more precise.  What I witnessed was not a rational manoeuvre, such as the end guns in a battery turning to face a threat from a flank.  It was instead a battery which had already lost all cohesion, and was widely scattered.  In that situation historically, I think the individual gun teams would have made their way to the rear as best they could, but here the guns just darted this way and that, in the same general area.  

It really was a very weird situation.  Sven's infantry were unable to capture the guns, because they were forever retiring just out of reach.  I was trying to help protect them with some cavalry from my division, but was also thwarted, because as soon as I managed to interpose my troopers, individual guns moved back towards the Sven's infantry!

Re your second point.  I wasn't aware of the pre-war artillery organisations, and yes that would certainly justify an improvement in at least some of the Reb battery stats.  Do you know if the same applied to Union volunteer batteries?

There may be a similar point to be made re some of the infantry units on both sides, which were also pre-war militia organisations.  Does anyone have any information on that?

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Pre-War Militia

Post  WSH Baylor on Thu Sep 04, 2014 4:26 pm

I was thinking about that last night after I posted the Arty. info, and you are correct in your thoughts. Here is a brief description of WSH Baylor including a reference to his pre-war service in Staunton, VA. (Yes, he was a real person and a cousin of my g-g- grandfather). http://stonewall.hut.ru/leaders/baylor.htm
Actually, as noted in this reference http://www.civilwarintheeast.com/People/B/BaylorWSH.php, he was involved in the pre-war militia as early as 1857.

In the south, militia companies had a history of community involvement, particularly during the early frontier days. They were a source of local protection when the regular army, which was quite small, was unavailable or some distance away. They also served as a source of community unity, social functions, et. al. Some of the pre-war militia companies could trace their lineage back to the Rev War. Most would meet at least once a month and, in the larger townships, even had constructed drill halls which served as community centers. Many of our US infantry regiments can trace their lineage back to pre-Civil War. For example, the 29th Infantry Regiment that landed at Utah Beach during WWII was known as the "Blue & Gray" regiment honoring Civil War militias from Maryland that fought on both sides during the war. Their unit patch is composed of both blue and gray colors. If you should ever get to the US, stop by their armory and museum in Baltimore.

So, in a nutshell, there were pre-war militias in both the North and South that participated in the war. If you want more references, will be glad to furnish.

Best regards,

Jack
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Thu Sep 04, 2014 4:37 pm

I think the artillery dodging and weaving is when their morale has failed. The game is pretty simple under the hood as we have found and both cavalry and artillery are really just infantry units with different stats. When infantry morale has failed but before they finally rout you cannot approach them. Getting close to them just causes them to shift position away from the closest threat. I am sure this is what those guns were doing. Were they limbered? If so then I'm sure morale failure is the cause here and you'll never capture them in this "bar of soap" state.

It is one of the dumb areas of the game. We're just lucky these dumb spots are so few.

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"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

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Retire by Prolonge

Post  WSH Baylor on Thu Sep 04, 2014 4:46 pm

Hey Diggers,

Think you are right!

One area of omission by that SoW Wizard "Jim", was retiring by prolonge. Simply, this involved the guns being "towed" by a prolonge rope, carried on the trail of every field gun, with the muzzle pointed towards the advancing enemy. As you noted, like so many errors by Norb's arty expert, "JIM", this is an error of omission.

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Tue Oct 28, 2014 8:22 pm

I don't think we'll have any more battles generated by the Nap campaign this turn, so if someone would like to offer up a stand-alone scenario for this weekend (I can make Friday and Saturday but not Sunday), please go ahead. I am open to all periods, not just Nap. However if people fel they'd like more practice in Nap tactics we can certainly run a 'training scenario'.

A good battle might be a refight of Vimerio Very Happy

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The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Uncle Billy on Wed Oct 29, 2014 6:11 pm

Vimerio would need players on both sides to run properly, I think. If you put up a doodle for an impromptu game, I'll make a player vs AI scenario, in case we don't have enough for your's.

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Wed Oct 29, 2014 6:25 pm

Doodle for a casual Nap game this weekend, hopeully some of our newer members will show up to improve their HITS skills and old ones can scrape the rust off.

http://doodle.com/dytu8gq9wtrbe3dd

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The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Uncle Billy on Thu Oct 30, 2014 10:26 pm

If we find we don't have enough players for another try at Vimerio, here is the background for a co-op battle.  It will be on the G'burg map on a part that hasn't seen much fighting.

Late October, 1813

General-Poruchik Mikhail Borozdin, commander of the vanguard, 8-y Korpus, has steadily advanced west.  Currently accompanying the 2-y Grenader Diviziya, the general has halted his advance so that his rearward divisions have an opportunity to move into easy supporting distance of the 7th and 27th divisions.  Scouts have reported a large body of French deployed west of the Fiume Oglio, which is dry this time of year.  Better information is not available as French cavalry has been aggressively patrolling the area.

Never a man of tactical subtlety, General Borozdin's preferred battlefield maneuver is straight ahead.  In this particular situation, circumstances require it.  North of his right flank is the city of Mantua which is fortified and well garrisoned by French troops.  So the road system in and out of that town is unavailable to him, even if he had wished for room to maneuver.  With his corps now assembled, he is ready to continue the advance and give battle.

Note: players may be no more than 200yd. in front of their troops.  Scouting in advance of the division will require a cavalry escort.  Both the 7th and 27th divisions have cavalry attached.  As stated above, the city of Mantua is off limits to the Russians.  In fact, everything north of the Strada Cremona is out of bounds.

Russian Order of Battle
8-y Korpus : General-Poruchik Mikhail Borozdin I ( 27'535 inf , 2'335 cav , 92 guns)

27-y Diviziya : General-Mayor Dmitry Neverovsky  ( 8'610 inf , 1'220 cav , 20 guns )
Brigada Aigustov : Polkovnik Aleksey Aigustov ( 3'160 inf )
Grenader Brigada Foch : General-Mayor Boris Foch I ( 2'230 inf )
Brigada Ivelich : General-Mayor  Peter Ivelich IV ( 3'220 inf )
Gvardiya Kavaleriyskaya Brigada Orlov-Denisov : General-Mayor Vasily Orlov-Denisov ( 1'220 cav )
5-y Batareya Truppa : Podpolkovnik Baron Fedor Tornov ( 12 guns )
2-y Gvardiyas Konnaya Artilleriya : Kapitan Alexander Rall IIl ( 8 guns )

7-y Diviziya : General-Poruchik Peter Kaptsevich ( 7'080 inf , 1'115 cav , 24 guns )
Brigada Rossi : General-Mayor Ignatii Rossi ( 2'980 inf )
Brigada Gurielov : General-Mayor Prince Ivan Gurielov ( 2'000 inf )
Brigada Aleksopol : General-Mayor Fedor Aleksopol ( 2'100 inf )
Gvardiya Kavaleriyskaya Brigada Chalikov : General-Mayor Anton Chalikov ( 1'115 cav )
22-y Konnaya Artilleriya : Podpolkovnik Yegor Khoven ( 12 guns )
1-y Konnaya Artilleriya : Host starshina Peter Tatsyn IV ( 12 guns )

26-y Diviziya : General-Mayor Ivan Paskevich ( 7'120 inf , 24 guns )
Brigada Rosen : General-Mayor Grigory Rosen I ( 3'900 inf )
Brigada Choglokov : General-Mayor Pavel Choglokov ( 3'220 inf )
11-y  Tyazhelaya Batareya Polozheniye : Podpolkovnik Peter Apushkin ( 12 guns )
23-y Tyazhelaya Batareya Polozheniye : Podpolkovnik Gulevich ( 12 guns )

2-y Grenader Diviziya : General-Mayor Karl von Mecklenburg-Schwerin  ( 4'725 inf , 24 guns )
Brigada Bogdanovsky : Podpolkovnik Andrey Bogdanovsky ( 2'960 inf )
Grenader Brigada Levin : Polkovnik Dmitry Levin ( 1'765 inf )
6-y  Batareya Truppa : LG Andrey Ditterix VI ( 12 guns )
4-y Konnaya Artilleriya : Polkovnik Pavel Merlin ( 12 guns )


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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Fri Oct 31, 2014 5:10 pm

Looks like a great battle.

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The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Iberalc on Fri Oct 31, 2014 11:08 pm

Seems it will be a funny, bloody and interesting battle, eager to take part. Cool
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Uncle Billy on Fri Oct 31, 2014 11:18 pm

Provided General Borozdin exercises caution, the Russians have good chances. Otherwise the battle may be brief but very exciting. affraid

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Sat Nov 01, 2014 4:07 pm

Doodle for a casual Nap game this weekend, hopeully some of our newer members will show up to improve their HITS skills and old ones can scrape the rust off.

http://doodle.com/dytu8gq9wtrbe3dd

We have six players for tonight which would make for a very good big co-op game, or a smaller adversarial scenario.

We will be starting at 20:00 GMT so please start gathering after 19:30. Thanks.

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The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Guest on Sun Nov 02, 2014 3:15 pm

T storm at game time but summer (dry season) is around the corner! bounce

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Re: Impromptu Games

Post  Mr. Digby on Sun Nov 02, 2014 8:20 pm

You missed a great game. I was C-in-C for a change and enjoyed myself immensely. We were all annoyed when the game ended at 2.5 hours because we were close to thrashing the Frenchies but were forced to stop.

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The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Impromptu Games

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