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Game Rules

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Game Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Fri Feb 19, 2016 11:09 pm

Rules for Kriegspiel 1813 Campaign – "Napoleon's Last Campaign in Germany".

1.0 Scale

1.1 Time and Turns

The campaign will be conducted in a series of turns, each of which represents 3 or 4 days.

Turn one will be the 27th to 30th April 1813. Turn two will be the 1st to 4th of May. Turn three will be the 5th to 7th May, and so on.

During each turn the two teams of generals may confer over strategy and then each player will submit his troops movement orders to the umpire via forum PM.

Orders will be executed in the sequence they are received.

1.1.1 Turn List

1. 27-30 Apr

2. 1-4 May
3. 5-7 May
4. 8-11 May
5. 12-15 May
6. 16-19 May
7. 20-23 May
8. 24-27 May
9. 28-31 May

10. 1-4 Jun
11. 5-7 Jun
12. 8-11 Jun
13. 12-15 Jun
14. 16-19 Jun
15. 20-23 Jun
16. 24-27 Jun
17. 28-30 Jun

18. 1-4 Jul
19. 5-7 Jul
20. 8-11 Jul
21. 12-15 Jul
22. 16-19 Jul
23. 20-23 Jul
24. 24-27 Jul
25. 28-31 Jul

26. 1-4 Aug
27. 5-7 Aug
28. 8-11 Aug
29. 12-15 Aug
30. 16-19 Aug
31. 20-23 Aug
32. 24-27 Aug
33. 28-31 Aug

34. 1-4 Sep
35. 5-7 Sep
36. 8-11 Sep
37. 12-15 Sep
38. 16-19 Sep
39. 20-23 Sep
40. 24-27 Sep
41. 28-30 Sep

42. 1-4 Oct
43. 5-7 Oct
44. 8-11 Oct
45. 12-15 Oct
46. 16-19 Oct
47. 20-23 Oct
48. 24-27 Oct
49. 28-31 Oct

50. 1-4 Nov
51. 5-7 Nov
52. 8-11 Nov
53. 12-15 Nov
54. 16-19 Nov
55. 20-23 Nov
56. 24-27 Nov
57. 28-31 Nov

1.2 Map Format and Scale

http://web.archive.org/web/20140622040853/http://www.murat.ca/maps.htm

Main operations will use the "Northern Germany" map. Thank you to Malcolm MacCullum for this awesome resource.

The map in use is a nodal map. It has settlements called nodes where troops are located and these nodes are linked by transit routes, or roads. Opposing forces will never collide on a transit link, only at nodes; two opposing forces may never pass each other from opposite nodes. The map scale is expressed in terms of how long it takes a body of troops to move between a series of nodes along a road and this time period is a half-week (3 or 4 days).

1.3 Troop Scale

The armies in use will be the historical forces in the field as at 1st May 1813 as far as research allows them to be presented. As weeks and months pass, reinforcements will become available to both sides. However the forces will be scaled down by one command level and by approximately 2/3rds strength. Thus an army of several corps will become a corps of several divisions. A single corps of several divisions will become a division containing the same number of brigades (practical considerations may require some compression or expansion) and a division will become a brigade containing a balanced representation of the relevant regiments. Infantry regiments may be compressed into battalions, cavalry regiments into squadrons and corps artillery assets will be reduced by 2/3rds the number of guns but maintain the correct tactical battery sizes where possible (usually 12, 8 or 6 guns depending on nationality and whether foot or horse artillery). These batteries will then be distributed to the corps (division) as closely as possible to the historical assets.

On the map the basic manoeuvre unit will be the army corps and in the battles this will be represented by a division, the customary command for one player in the multi-player online games. Infantry map corps (battlefield divisions) will commonly have an integral cavalry brigade (though this is not always the case) and cavalry corps will be represented by cavalry divisions.

The smallest element that a player may issue independent orders to on the map is a division, which in the scaled down representation is a brigade on the battlefield.

1.3.1 Troop Formation Naming Convention

For clarity these rules will from now use the following naming convention:

MAP

Army = MA
Corps = MC
Cavalry Corps = MCC
Division = MD

BATTLEFIELD

Army (now Corps) = BC
Corps (now Division) = BD
Cavalry Corps (now Cavalry Division) = BCD
Division (now Brigade) = BB

Unless otherwise specified the term MC also refers to MCC. Likewise BD refers to BCD.

1.4 Command Scale

Each player will be a senior general most often in command of a corps (MC) or army (MA). This will be played somewhat like a committee game with all players of one side able to confer and plan moves for each turn. Given the density of fairly good communication routes, good knowledge of the region concerned, the half-week length of each turn and proximity of opposing forces, military information will travel speedily and fairly reliably, giving each team the opportunity to discuss moves before committing their troops to a march.

2.0 Map

The maps in use are those drawn by Malcolm McCallum and are available here:

http://web.archive.org/web/20140622040853/http://www.murat.ca/maps.htm

The campaign will principally use the Northern Germany map with some operations possibly spreading to the Upper Germany map (that is, Southern Germany) and Poland.

Some edits will be made to indicate which fortresses control river crossings.

The map, although it gives some artistic indication of terrain and topography, is an abstract nodal map, with all map movement conducted by roads that link settlements. All troops will at all times be in a settlement or in transit between two settlements.

There is no cross-country movement allowed.

2.1 Roads, Traffic Capacity, Movement Rates

Roads are divided into two categories; Good and Poor. Good roads are shown on the map as a pair of solid lines. They are paved and permit ten divisions (MD) to pass along them in a half-week period. Poor roads are shown on the map as a pair of closer together, partially broken lines. They are unsurfaced and permit only five divisions (MD) to pass along them in a half-week period.

Infantry moving along a Good road may move three nodes. Infantry moving along a Poor road may move two. Cavalry may move an additional node (four and three). Foot artillery moves at the speed of infantry; horse artillery at the speed of cavalry.

2.1.2 Forced Marches and Fatigue

Troops may be ordered to force march on the map which will advance them an additional node. They will however then become fatigued. Fatigue prevents forced marches and lowers all unit experience ratings by 1. It impacts troops if they fight a battle during the turn they force march. Fatigue is lifted by remaining halted one turn or marching a normal turns march.[size=13]

The penalty for the fatigue incurred by force marching will apply in any battles in the turn in which the force march is ordered, and the subsequent turn.

2.2 Rivers

W
[/size]here roads cross rivers there are assumed to be suitable crossing places of a quality consummate with the road type. Crossing a river will reduce the number of nodes that a body of troops may move by one. Thus a poor road that crosses a river will require a full turn for a body of infantry to march from the node on one side into the node on the far side.

The transit link between two nodes that crosses a river does not represent a bridge but merely the facility in that region to permit traffic to cross. Consider it to be a range of crossing options open to a corps-sized body of men. It could be several bridges, it could be fordable in summer, it could be boats. It is not practical to eliminate (such as blow up or burn the bridges) or interdict the river crossing points unless enough troops are stationed in the node at one end of the link to discourage however many troops the enemy chooses to put against the crossing area.

References to bridges in narrative reports of actions near rivers are added merely for colourful effect.

See also Fortresses and Garrisons (2.3.1) and Pontoon Trains (5.2).

2.3 Settlements

The map distinguishes three classes of settlement: Towns (small circle), City (large circle) and Fortress (Circle with defensive angles). In addition some settlements are ports, indicated by an anchor symbol.

2.3.1 Fortresses and Garrisons

Garrisons may be left in any fortress. Garrisons must be a minimum of one division (MD) in strength and cannot initiate battles. They may only leave when they possess an open LoCS to the rear. They act to deny the enemy full use of the road network and any river crossing through that node. To contain or invest a garrisoned fortress an opponent must allocate a force at least equal in size to the defence (minimum one MD). Once this is accomplished, further forces friendly to the investing force may pass through the garrisoned fortress node but deduct one node movement allowance.

Garrisoned fortresses that control river crossings prevent the use of that crossing for as long as the garrison remains regardless of the presence of any investing force.

Fortresses held out for many months during the 1813 campaign. Forces investing such places rarely made the effort to storm the defence and risk high losses. The usual method to reduce a fortress was by starvation. Therefore both garrison and investing forces are effectively neutralised until the end of the campaign or until a truce is agreed that allows the garrison to withdraw.

However, should the investor have allocated more MDs to the investment than the garrison has MDs, a random time limit calculation may decide if the garrison surrenders unconditionally after a shorter period of time. The investor will take losses from this more aggressive approach (which is presumed to involve active siege work and is always optional) and will then be free to employ the investing force elsewhere.

French retention of her garrisoned fortresses impacts her prestige and the loyalty of some Allied German states. Refer to rules 4.3 and 4.5.

2.4 Terrain

The nodal nature of the map results in no terrain or march speed effects on campaign movement beyond those governed by roads, rivers and fatigue (see 2.1, 2.1.2 and 2.2). Distance between nodes and road quality becomes the defining function of how easy or difficult it is to pass through a region.

On the battlefield consideration will be given to the type of terrain indicated around the settlement where a battle is to be fought and suitable terrain types will be chosen (farmland, forested, hilly, river crossing, etc).

3.0 Strategy and Objectives

This rule section is included to encourage historical play and suppress hindsight play.

3.1 France

Napoleon must retain control of Germany and halt, neutralise or throw back his enemies. Driving the Russians back east of a specific boundary is the initial requirement, or exhausting them by a series of battles won against them.


Prussian resurgence must be contained. This may be achieved by several means.


The Austrians must be kept neutral by means of territorial or dynastic concessions.

With Prussia neutralised Sweden is no threat.

Napoleon may use free-form diplomacy and offer concessions as he sees fit to attain his objectives. Over lenient concessions however will result in a diplomatic victory for the Coalition.

[[The exact details of required victory conditions are given only in the French forum.]]

3.2 Coalition

The Coalition has been formed to rid Germany of Napoleon and the hated French for once and all. French forces must be exhausted in battle or manoeuvred westwards beyond a specific boundary. This may be achieved by battles or diplomacy.

Diplomacy is without rules and free-form. The Coalition may offer any concessions it wishes. Lenient concessions however will result in a diplomatic victory for Napoleon.


[[The exact details of required victory conditions are given only in the Coalition forum.]]

4.0 Exhaustion, Truces, Loyalty, Austria and Prestige


4.1 Exhaustion and Rallying

When a map corps or division (MC or MD) loses a battle it is considered to be exhausted. It may fight but suffers the effects of fatigue (see 2.1.2) for three turns (one and a half weeks).
 
A MC or MD that loses a further battle when exhausted will withdraw along its LoCS to the nearest fortress and remain there as a garrison for six turns (three weeks).

Army HQs, if they are present in a node with an exhausted force, may rally (remove the exhausted status from) one MC. This requires a full turn not moving, in supply and not in combat.

4.1.1 Army Commanders

Army HQs should always be with one of their subordinate corps unless road capacity circumstances make this impractical. When an army HQ is present in battle that commander with his SoW benefits is also present. If he is not he will either be AI controlled or player controlled but with a row of zeros for his stats.

4.2 Truces

If any nation member of the Coalition suffers three MC exhausted simultaneously that nation will sue for peace and sign a temporary truce.

If France suffers four MC exhausted simultaneously Napoleon will sue for peace and sign a temporary truce.

Truces may also be agreed at any time by free-form mutual consent of the two sides. Such truces may contain any terms either side is able to negotiate.

Troops may usually move freely during a truce but not closer to any enemy or beyond agreed boundaries and no battles may occur. Invested or garrisoned fortresses may be exchanged or vacated during a truce.

4.3 Loyalty

Certain German states are becoming weary of war and perceive Napoleon's power as waning.

If the campaign begins to go against the French, certain German allied nations may declare themselves neutral or join the Coalition.

[[
The specific mechanism governing this is given in the French forum.]]

4.4 Austria

Austria begins the campaign neutral. She has mobilised her army but her intentions are unknown. It is not at all certain if she will join the Sixth Coalition, remain neutral, or even be coerced or encouraged to fight alongside the French.

Austrian decisions will be affected by the progress of the campaign. She will most likely side with the partner that shows indications of being ultimately successful in attaining their objectives.

Her present diplomatic and dynastic views are however known to be cautiously pro-Coalition.


4.5 Prestige


Prestige is the overall measure by which Napoleon and France are viewed by the many nations of Europe. Enhanced or collapsed Prestige may even result in the 1813 campaign being won or lost. However an outright military victory (see 3.1) will outweigh the factor of Prestige (and will of course directly influence it).

 
+1 Prestige is gained for France with:
 
Each fortress in Germany garrisoned by French or Allied troops, per half-week
Each French or Allied Corps on the right bank of the Elbe, per half-week
Each victory in battle over a single Coalition corps or lesser force
French occupation of Berlin, per half-week
French occupation of Dresden, per half-week

+2 Prestige is gained for France with:

 
Each French or Allied Corps on the right bank of the Oder, per half-week
 
+3 Prestige is gained for France with:
 
Each victory in battle over an army of more than one Coalition corps
A member nation of the Coalition sues for peace through exhaustion
 
-1 Prestige is lost by France with:
 
Each Coalition Corps on the left bank of the Saale or left bank of the Elbe north of its confluence with the Saale, per half-week
Each German Ally of France that changes allegiance to become neutral
Each victory in battle by the Coalition over a single French corps or lesser force where Napoleon is not present
 
-2 Prestige is lost by France with:
 
Each French-held fortress in Germany that is lost to the Coalition or a neutral state
Each Ally of France that changes allegiance to fight alongside the Coalition
Each victory in battle by the Coalition over an army of more than one French corps where Napoleon is not present
 
-3 Prestige is lost by France with:
 
France sues for peace through exhaustion
 
-4 Prestige is lost by France with:
 
Each victory in battle by the Coalition over a French force where Napoleon is present
 
If the Prestige score reaches 0 (zero), Napoleon has lost the 1813 campaign and will withdraw his armies west of the Rhine. All French-controlled fortresses in Germany surrender.
 
5.0 Campaigning

5.1 Lines of Communication and Supply

Lines of Communication and Supply (LoCS) are vital to support troops for the conduct of strategic operations. Any garrisoned fortress contains a depot sufficient to support the operations of one army. LoCS are traced along any road back to a fortress by the shortest route or the route by which individual corps and divisions have advanced.

If an enemy force of at least MD strength occupies a node along an LoCS, the force suffering the cut line will suffer as though fatigued (see 2.1.2) until the LoCS is restored.

Such forces may move back along their cut LoCS normally but may no longer advance further from their base of supply.

A cut LoCS will also prevent any replacement troops reaching the isolated MC (see 5.3).

5.2 Pontoon Trains

Each army has one bridging train. Unless otherwise, it moves with the last-listed infantry corps of each army. A bridge of boats may be built across any river in one map turn. The bridge allows movement between the occupied node and any node empty of enemy on the opposite river bank as though there were a road link in place.

Pontoon bridges may remain in place or be taken up and moved. Dismantling a bridge of boats takes a full map turn and breaks any LoCS that crossed it.

A deployed pontoon train or one that is moving to re-join its army must be escorted by a minimum of one MD at all times.

A pontoon train will be captured by the enemy if the force it is with is defeated in battle.

5.3 Cavalry Screening and Scouting

Battle cavalry and efficient scouting light cavalry is in short supply to both sides, although Napoleon suffers somewhat more. The Russians have numerous Cossacks but these are not battle cavalry and should not be relied upon in our online battles. They have value in scouting and screening however.

There are two types of cavalry screen. That provided by the cavalry integral to a MC (called 'integral cavalry') and separate cavalry corps (map cavalry corps or MCC).

Cavalry is assumed at all times to be conducting screening, scouting and VIP and messenger escort duties to the best of its ability. Integral cavalry allows a force to identify enemy presence one node away. If integral cavalry is stronger numerically than that of the enemy it will in addition give its HQ a brief report on enemy strength and composition. The greater the favourable ratio of cavalry strengths between the two forces the more reliable the report.

A cavalry MC will identify enemy presence two nodes away. A cavalry MC will always out-scout enemy integral cavalry and provide a report of enemy strength and composition. Only an opposing cavalry MC will neutralise the superior scouting of a cavalry MC. In this case a comparison of the relative strengths of the two opposing MCC will result in one side gaining more accurate intelligence on its enemy.

Coalition forces that have cavalry may screen or patrol one node further than French forces. This represents information given to Coalition troops by civilians and denied to the French by the same disaffected persons.


The extended scouting and information-gathering range of MCC or Coalition cavalry does not extend beyond the first node encountered that contains enemy troops. Thus, if a Coalition cavalry corps is in node A and a French force is in node D, normally the Coalition cavalry would receive news of the French three nodes away. However if even a French infantry division were in node B, the presence of the force at D (or indeed a French force at C) would not be discovered.


5.4 Losses and Replacements

Losses in battles will be calculated using the post game dump file generated by the Scourge of War – Waterloo software and this will be processed using the Campaign Casualty Carryover Tool developed by Niall. The winner and loser of a battle and whether it was a minor or major win/lose will be adjudicated by the umpire based on how successful each side was in achieving the objectives set in the scenario. Losses suffered or inflicted very rarely influence the outcome; so do not be influenced by the battle result screen displayed at the end of the game!

Replacements will flow to both sides down the LoCS of each respective MC using historical rates as far as I am able to determine them. If an LoCS is cut, no replacements will arrive until it is re-opened. The activation of additional forces will occur broadly in line with historical events, however a variable is included.


5.5 Battles

Generals will be informed via their cavalry screens of nearby enemies. Based on these reports a decision should be made on whether to advance upon an adjacent enemy-occupied node which will make that force the tactical attacker, or to stand and receive any advance made by the enemy which will make that force the tactical defender. Any force that is advanced upon by an enemy may also elect to withdraw back along its LoCS and give up the node to the enemy. If the node contains a fortress a garrison may optionally be put into it (or if already there, taken out and attached to the field force).
 
A force that chooses to stand and defend if attacked gives up the initiative and may not move except to withdraw down its LoCS that map turn. It will however be able to choose its defensive ground on the battle map provided by the game umpire.

5.5.1 Marching to the Sound of the Guns


A force within one node of a battle may march to the sound of the guns. If the commanding player chooses to so march, in the online battle the force will be present at the extreme appropriate map edge and may either begin marching to battle at once or after an imposed time delay as determined by the game umpire.

A force may not march to the sound of the guns along a transit link that has already reached its traffic capacity that turn.

Forces may march to the sound of the guns across a river line but in this case Coalition forces will arrive fatigued while French and Allied will not. This distinction represents the expertise French engineers demonstrated in building bridges of boats in very short spans of time. Coalition engineers did not demonstrate a similar capacity.


5.5.2 Maximum Battle Size, Reserves, Rearguards and Pursuit Forces

No more than 4 corps may be present in a battle, including reinforcements. Additional troops will remain in reserve and will be used to cover a retreat or conduct a pursuit. If such reserves are present on both sides the effects of the rearguard/pursuit actions are neutralised. However if one side has reserves and the other does not, additional losses will be inflicted during a pursuit, or some losses will be recovered by a rearguard action.

5.5.2.1 Exploit Marches

A force that has won an easy victory while attacking; that is, advancing on the strategic map ("easy" in that the ground was hardly contested or the force disparity was very great) may continue its march to advance one more node.

If this would push it beyond its march allowance, including river crossing delays, the move is not possible.

Any such move, regardless of how much marching has been done beforehand, will fatigue all the forces that make the march.

This will always be an optional march for the winner of a battle. Such a march is not open to the winner of a battle who was on the strategic defensive (did not advance on the map that turn).

Comment: Note that a smaller force that contends ground in a determined way can thereby be used to buy time and halt a stronger enemy, though at the risk of its own destruction. Such actions were occasional features of Napoleonic warfare and this rule covers these and similar events.

5.5.3 Napoleon's Presence on the Field of Battle

If Napoleon is present in person and assumes command, all units of the French and Allied force have their experience rating raised by 1.


Last edited by Mr. Digby on Thu Mar 17, 2016 9:27 am; edited 21 times in total

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Game Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Tue Feb 23, 2016 5:51 pm

Game rules finished. I have now incorporated everything I wanted to that is relevant to the 1813 campaign and what mechanisms made it "tick" the way it did. Anything else will be adjustments as we play the game. The hidden bits relevant to each side I'll add to those forums soon.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Game Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Fri Mar 04, 2016 4:18 pm

ADDENDUM No.1    4th MARCH 2016:

The following paragraph has been added to rule 5.3 Cavalry Screening and Scouting

"The extended scouting and information-gathering range of MCC or Coalition cavalry does not extend beyond the first node encountered that contains enemy troops. Thus, if a Coalition cavalry corps is in node A and a French force is in node D, normally the Coalition cavalry would receive news of the French three nodes away. However if even a French infantry division were in node B, the presence of the force at D (or indeed a French force at C) would not be discovered."

The following paragrpahs have been added to rule 5.5.1 Marching to the Sound of the Guns

A force may not march to the sound of the guns along a transit link that has already reached its traffic capacity that turn.

Forces may march to the sound of the guns across a river line but in this case Coalition forces will arrive fatigued while French and Allied will not. This distinction represents the expertise French engineers demonstrated in building bridges of boats in very short spans of time. Coalition engineers did not demonstrate a similar capacity.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Game Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Sat Mar 05, 2016 5:29 pm

ADDENDUM No.2    5th MARCH 2016:

The following paragraph has been added to rule 2.2 Rivers

The transit link between two nodes that crosses a river does not represent a bridge but merely the facility in that region to permit traffic to cross. Consider it to be a range of crossing options open to a corps-sized body of men. It could be several bridges, it could be fordable in summer, it could be boats. It is not practical to eliminate (such as blow up or burn the bridges) or interdict the river crossing points unless enough troops are stationed in the node at one end of the link to discourage however many troops the enemy chooses to put against the crossing area.

References to bridges in narrative reports of actions near rivers are added merely for colourful effect.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Game Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Sun Mar 06, 2016 1:32 pm

ADDENDUM No.3    6th MARCH 2016:

The following paragraph has been added to rule 2.1.2 Forced Marches and Fatigue:


The penalty for the fatigue incurred by force marching will apply in any battles in the turn in which the force march is ordered, and the subsequent turn.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Game Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Mon Mar 14, 2016 8:56 am

ADDENDUM No.4    14th MARCH 2016:

Rule 5.5.2.1 Exploit Marches, is added.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Game Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Thu Mar 17, 2016 9:29 am

ADDENDUM No.5    17th MARCH 2016:


Amended rule 4.1 Exhaustion and Rallying and added rule 4.1.1 Army Commanders. Amended rule rule 5.1 Lines of Communication and Supply.




4.0 Exhaustion, Truces, Loyalty, Austria and Prestige

4.1 Exhaustion and Rallying

When a map corps or division (MC or MD) loses a battle it is considered to be exhausted. It may fight but suffers the effects of fatigue (see 2.1.2) for three turns (one and a half weeks).
 
A MC or MD that loses a further battle when exhausted will withdraw along its LoCS to the nearest fortress and remain there as a garrison for six turns (three weeks).

Army HQs, if they are present in a node with an exhausted force, may rally (remove the exhausted status from) one MC. This requires a full turn not moving, in supply and not in combat.

4.1.1 Army Commanders

Army HQs should always be with one of their subordinate corps unless road capacity circumstances make this impractical. When an army HQ is present in battle that commander with his SoW benefits is also present. If he is not he will either be AI controlled or player controlled but with a row of zeros for his stats.

 
 
 
 
 
 
5.1 Lines of Communication and Supply

Lines of Communication and Supply (LoCS) are vital to support troops for the conduct of strategic operations. Any garrisoned fortress contains a depot sufficient to support the operations of one army. LoCS are traced along any road back to a fortress by the shortest route or the route by which individual corps and divisions have advanced.

If an enemy force of at least MD strength occupies a node along an LoCS, the force suffering the cut line will suffer as though fatigued (see 2.1.2) until the LoCS is restored.

Such forces may move back along their cut LoCS normally but may no longer advance further from their base of supply.

A cut LoCS will also prevent any replacement troops reaching the isolated MC (see 5.3).

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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