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MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

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MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Leffe7 on Sun May 06, 2012 1:23 pm

Falling into a trap

A fictional multiplayer scenario for 9-11 players.
Scenario length: 150 minutes
HITS and Courier gameplay as usual
Used mod: Latest Couriers and Maps mod
SOW has to be launched in Fullscreen mode



Trailer: The Federal attack on Iuka was successfull and the town is now under Union control. The Rebel forces fled the area in disarray, but still remain a future threat to the Union supply lines. General Grant devised a cunning plan to end this threat. While one of Rosecrans' divisions is in pursuit of the Confederates, General Ords division is advancing from the opposite direction. As both divisions are closing the distance, the Rebels soon will find themselves in a trap with no way out.



The available positions are:

CSA [5 players minimum]
1 CinC
1 Cavalry Commander
1 Division Commander
+ Brigade Commanders

USA - Team 1 [2 players minimum]
1 CinC
+ Brigade Commander(s)

USA - Team 2 [2 players minimum]
1 CinC
+ Brigade Commander(s)

Note: The Union side has two independent Commanders-in-Chief. Due to the scenario setup, the 2 CinC's are not allowed to discuss a combined Union strategy before the game! They can only start to communicate by couriers when in-game.

  • The CinC (Commander-in-Chief) will be tasked to develop a strategy and write battle orders some days before game launch.
  • 1 week before the game: If there are roughly enough players, I will assign all committed players to teams, appoint the chief commanders, and then send the initial briefing to players by e-mail. CinC begin to write their orders and assign players of their team to available slots. Additional players may still join the game up to 3 days before the game start.
  • 1-3 days before: Players receive their orders by their CinC. If there aren't enough players committed to meet the minimum requirements, the game will be cancelled.
  • 30 minutes before game start: meeting in the K/S teamspeak lobby - strategy discussion and questions

Please follow this doodle link to register: http://www.doodle.com/ms8g2nua9s9edcbg

If you have not played with our group before, please send me your E-Mail by the forum message system.


Last edited by Leffe7 on Wed May 16, 2012 9:35 am; edited 2 times in total
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Leffe7 on Sun May 13, 2012 4:09 pm

The scenario will be played Saturday, 26th may, 19h30 UK time.
There are still open slots if anyone wants to join.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Mr. Digby on Mon May 14, 2012 10:32 am

My name is down Wink
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Martin on Mon May 14, 2012 3:03 pm

Me too.

Martin

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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  kg_sspoom on Fri May 25, 2012 3:00 am

I should be home from Charleston late Friday night and would like to play if there are open slots. I may not be able to register on doodle since I'm on my phone only
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Mr. Digby on Fri May 25, 2012 11:27 am

What time can you make Saturday Steve? I think the Union team needs more players. The CSA side is about full.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Leffe7 on Fri May 25, 2012 3:24 pm

Hi steve, if you can play, you will be in MTGs team.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  kg_sspoom on Fri May 25, 2012 4:03 pm

We should be home well before midnight tonight. So it shouldnt be a problem time wise
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  kg_sspoom on Sat May 26, 2012 3:47 am

Im home someone want to e-mail me the specifics of battle?
My assignment and such.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Martin on Sat May 26, 2012 8:53 am

kg_sspoom wrote:Im home someone want to e-mail me the specifics of battle?
My assignment and such.
Done........

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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Baldwin1 on Sun May 27, 2012 6:59 pm

Excellent scenario Stefan, I thoroughly enjoyed it. It was unfortunate I had to leave with 15 or 20 min to spare. I'd like to know the outcome or if it is going to be picked up from where we left off?

Here is that great Confederate cavalry vs infantry charge to which this victory was only heard of via couriers due to General Armstrong [Khryses] being out of viewing distance:


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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Leffe7 on Sun May 27, 2012 10:57 pm

Thanks Baldwin. We then soon lost another player and decided to end the battle at around 20h05 in-game time. So we didnt see the final showdown with the Rebels Last Stand in the Misty Mountains Wink
I'm eager to read some AARs to learn more what happened outside my restricted view, but my preliminary result of the battle is a confederate victory, congratulations! After crippling Ords division, General Price and his survivors were able to disengage and disappear in the night. General Rosecrans wasn't able to enter the battle in time. Maybe the setup wasnt very balanced or a bit too much distance between the units - sorry for that. Being on the CS side it was really disturbing to know that you could suddenly be ambushed from either side by Rosecrans!
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Around the Map in 125 Minutes; or, If you want to have a good time...

Post  Khryses on Mon May 28, 2012 4:28 pm

...join the cavalry!

Falling into a trap, 26th May - Armstrong's AAR



Looking at that map now, it looks like I've let my 3-year-old cousin loose with a crayon, but I'll try to make sense of it.

Most units are NOT placed where they started (since with certain exceptions I didn't know that), but where I first ran into them after the scenario started.


Gen'l Armstrong (fresh from his musical interlude with the ladies of Iuka) led Price's division in the retreat from that city. Thinking back on the nightmare that had been trying to protect the wagon train - and then the extreme Rebel right - against the relentless pursuit of at least two Federal bdes still filled me with horrible visions that could only be quenched with his whiskey flask. That was infantry work - brave as they are, my boys simply didn't have their staying power!

That was one reason that I was so pleased with my mission in this latest scenario. No longer chained to the irritatingly slow wagons with their dubious survival instincts, and given good cavalry work on superb cavalry ground by General Price (with his 'foot cavalry', he deserves the accolade pirat), I had a good feeling about this one - though I was still a little paranoid about the Yankees coming up booming behind us. You see, while I knew the Federals weren't allowed to talk to one another in advance we still knew that we were essentially caught between two converging columns, which while weaker weren't that much weaker. I'll let Gen'l Price expound on his general strategy at his leisure, but suffice to say that he decided that punching out the nearer enemy command was not only desirable but eminently doable - though I for one was certain that we would find Hamilton slamming home into our rear while we were fully engaged, to our detriment (time would prove me wrong). On top of this, finally being out from among those sodding fences was... liberating to say the least.

Riding north, I left the three irregular cavalry regiments under my command on the Johns Creek Road crossroads and proceeded north and east to the Croft place with my regulars, the 2nd Arkansas. Looking to the north and east, I could see no sign of Ord's command - could he have somehow escaped us? Since we weren't confined to the roads, had he bizarrely decided to flee due west over the high country? Fortunately for our mission, we received a courier from Gen'l Price at this juncture, reminding us of the low light conditions and reduced visibility. Reassured - and slightly disturbed by his prescience - we began to quarter the ground eastward toward the New Castle road, but to no avail. I had just decided to shift my scouting west when I caught a glimpse of a blue horseman riding hard down the road toward New Castle. Turning back that way I spotted a flag... then another flag... then a whole column of infantry. As my regiment watched my back, I rode in closer to the Federal commanders, tipping my hat to them before dashing off a message to Gen'l Price enumerating the forces within my visibility.

The first stage of my mission complete, I looked at the map and noticed that while I'd lost touch with the main Confederate column, there was a solid chance that the Federals would actually get to the heights behind New Castle first. Calling in the 2nd Ark, I committed them to charge out of the evening shadows into a conveniently isolated blue regiment in march column. Fortunately their commander was on the ball - or had possibly been keeping an eye on me - and rode over to order them into line. While my boys fought bravely, they were unable to ride down a formed unit of Yankee foot - something I kept in mind in the future. Following them as they fell back, I observed the chaos as the Federal columns began shaking out into lines all around me, and set to riding with my men through a gap in the column. It was then to my surprise that I saw a number of limbered Yankee guns moving down the road ahead of me, and sent in my regulars; to my knowledge we seized two or three of them before increasing Federal infantry fire drove us off. As the 2nd Arkansas rallied once again, I could see the other Union guns firing at the captured guns with heavy infantry support, eliminating the sudden incursion into their line. Gen'l Price's forces being visible coming out of New Castle in good order, I judged my presence no longer necessary and led the weary Arkansas around Ord's rear and back to my brigade. Arriving there I observed with amusement a respectable pile of union couriers laying dead among one of my regiments formed astride the road, and after a moment's thought assigned the 2nd Arkansas to picket the junction as they recovered their dander.

Leading the three fresh regiments of cavalry back toward the attack on Ord, I began swinging back up toward Croft and the Union rear as previously instructed, only to receive information that Green's Bde had somehow become separated from the main body and was being forced back and away from Price's flank. Riding ahead of my brigade, I found Green heavily engaged and in danger of becoming enveloped. Having duly exchanged our compliments and ascertained his state I resolved to seal the breach in our lines where two Yankee regiments were coming up. With any luck they would prove wearied and vulnerable to my fresh horse... but better safe than sorry as my lead regiment charged sabres drawn into their hastily formed line. Sure enough after a brisk exchange my irregulars fell back to reform - and the second body of cavalry we had meantime formed on the flank of the skirmish slammed home into the Federals before they could restore their formation. Driving them back in full flight, they rode on and into the second Federal regiment - this time with me riding close enough to supply commander's bonus. Whether that made the difference or they were more damaged, they promptly fell back as well.

Green's position hopefully now sustainable, I reformed my horse and looked around the situation - to my right Price seemed to be carrying the day, to my left Green seemed to be regaining his footing and well capable of holding. Ahead was a hillock studded with a massed Federal grand battery, and the two regiments of infantry just reforming from our charge. Pressing onward we repeated the tactic of charge-and-a-flank to good effect, this time forcing both regiments to surrender and cascading onto the ridge, hacking around us with gay abandon as we seized gun after gun - but there were a LOT of Federal guns, and more bluejacketed infantry coming up behind. When my lead regiment took to their heels I sent in the second, and then the third - encouraged by the courier messages I was receiving and the delight of getting some of our own back after my brigade's torturous experience outside of Iuka. Finally the fire grew too hot for us and we drew off away from Ord's Hill, still casting nervous glances at our rear for the sight of blue jackets. Seeing my irregulars were fairly fought out, I dispatched them to clear our planned retreat route for our movement after we would finish with Ord [Kh: Yes, this is code for 'they routed' - overpowered cavalry, huh? Laughing] and reported to Gen'l Price for further instructions.

It seemed he shared my concern, for he sent me off to find Gen'l Hamilton's command and report back to him their position and number. The 2nd Arkansas somewhat recovered, I instructed them to meet me east of Aps Knob and rode to inspect our most vulnerable point - the direct path between the Webbs Mill trail and our rear. As you can see from my map, I was less than successful - our ride took us over hill and dale, eventually deciding the enemy must have been coming up the Johns Creek road instead of risking the better defensive terrain [Kh: If we'd actually had a rearguard - again I commend Gen'l Price's guts cheers] and seeking them there. Given the slight intelligence lapse at the start of the battle, I was somewhat surprised when I didn't find any sign of the enemy by Penny Hollow, and was on the point of riding back to check the eastmost approaches to the New Castle battle area when I was informed that the main army was moving out to Peters Hill. Still sending back regular reports of no contact, we proceeded around the trail to Reynolds without incident, and began sweeping back across the army's flank. Spotting 3rd Division's supply wagon coming down from Johns Creek Mountain, we rode it to ground on the Aps Knob trail and took it under new management; it was directed to rendezvous with our column at Lugar. It was only right that the Federal army should replenish our minie balls when we had given them so many of our own while firing at Ord! Wink

Proceeding eastward along the Aps Knob trail, I took a swig of Armstrong's excellent whiskey [Kh: Read 'a new coffee'] and promptly found myself riding into Hamilton's elusive division, bearing westward. cross-country. I'm a little fuzzy on the details after that, but riding back and forth through the column I was able to charge one infantry regiment to no effect (my brave boys reformed, though I had to stay pretty much constantly with them after this as they kept trying to rout), charge down a gun and very nearly took a tempting column of limbered guns as they fled before me. Pursuing them over a ridge I was stunned to find a number of infantry regiments lined up facing me and opening fire... immense kudos to Blaugrana for that, it was a wonderfully sneaky trap I was NOT expecting. I wound up exchanging fire with various Union infantry for some time after that, nearly taking Blaugrana and kgspoom at various points when they seemed exposed. At some points it looked like the entire division was chasing me, as I did my best to delay their movement after Price's column. At one point I seized a communique between Blaugrana and Hamilton alerting that worthy of Price's march west from Nutters Mtn [Kh: The most recent update I'd had on our progress, ironically] and I began my retreat in that direction, falling back in leaps and bounds and exchanging fire with the lead Federal elements as I struggled not to get cut off by the converging columns of Union foot. Finally the strain of near half an hour of continuous engagement was too much for the 2nd Arkansas and they began to rout - although they obeyed my orders long past when the game seemed to think they ought to. [Kh: At the end of the battle I was the proud commander of -6 men Laughing ]

Concerned for my men's welfare, and with no means to slow Hamilton's advance beyond throwing myself under his horse and hoping he would trip, I determined to rejoin Gen'l Price and see about reforming my men five miles past Lugar.

I am pleased to report that they are reformed well with only 40 percent losses, and still exchanging stories of the Battle of the Misty Mountains. The 2nd Arkansas appear to be the heroes of the piece, and rightly so.

I am pleased to remain,

Your humble servant,

Brigadier General Frank Crawford Armstrong,
Confederate States Army.

NB: I look forward to hearing how everything went from other perspectives - I missed much of Price's engagement with Ord and am still unsure of how we left that. And where on earth did Hamilton go to elude all our scouting until he showed up marching westward?
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Thoughts on Iuka III - Armstrong

Post  Khryses on Mon May 28, 2012 4:52 pm

-The low light caught me by surprise, but turned out to be outstandingly useful for cavalry - it made our scouting even more important (though I hear a few lone generals were doing it too Razz) and was pretty much critical to our early success in the Ord engagement - we were both surprised when we finally found his column, but we were faster and able to largely elude them.

-What happened to the Union cavalry? I saw it once - Ord's at least, unsure if Hamilton had any - and then lost track of it.

-Having only fought two previous engagements in the Iuka series - each time escorting wagons - I was absolutely delighted to be let off my wagon-leash as Armstrong. This is NOT a criticism of the wonderfully inventive use of them to determine a scenario, just an appreciation of the creative difference in the suite cheers

-I haven't normally played cavalry in SoW prior to these scenarios - thanks to these in depth missions, I feel I'm getting the hang of them - both when trying to pull a Buford and when trying to be Stuart (with varying degrees of success). Cool

-I couldn't participate in the discussion after the battle about the 'overpowered' cavalry, but on the whole I feel they're about right - even going downhill fresh into weary Union foot, they couldn't smash their way through one-on-one without the commander practically riding with them all the way in, and that a lucky one. Most of the 'glorious Rohan charge' was down to the second-stage counterpunch into the infantry before they could reform from the first melee, and it still left me with a sharply reduced command. If we tweak them down much more, we risk making them even flimsier than they were when I was trying to hold in Iuka I.

-What's next? A replay through the campaign, or does Leffe have some more excellent mischief up his sleeve? Thanks again for inviting me to this, I very much enjoy this style of play.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Baldwin1 on Mon May 28, 2012 6:57 pm

Note: I believe I was near the center right alongside Gen. Gates in and around the small village so it must be Gen. Martin you were fighting alongside on the extreme left flank. It looked like that flank hanged in the balance, so good job to you and Gen. Martin for holding your ground despite being so far from the main infantry body. It is also interesting that you said we were being followed by part of Ord's division during the withdrawal, I couldn't see that from my vantage point. The night visibility had a good fog of war effect. I could swear I heard carbines being fired in the distance during our withdrawal, but no one can be sure with those sound echoes in the valleys and mountains.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Khryses on Mon May 28, 2012 7:25 pm

Baldwin1 wrote:Note: I believe I was near the center right alongside Gen. Gates in and around the small village so it must be Gen. Martin you were fighting alongside on the extreme left flank. It looked like that flank hanged in the balance, so good job to you and Gen. Martin for holding your ground despite being so far from the main infantry body. It is also interesting that you said we were being followed by part of Ord's division during the withdrawal, I couldn't see that from my vantage point. The night visibility had a good fog of war effect. I could swear I heard carbines being fired in the distance during our withdrawal, but no one can be sure with those sound echoes in the valleys and mountains.

Hamilton's division - to my knowledge I engaged every significant body of Yankees in the battle, for what good it did Laughing
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Blaugrana on Mon May 28, 2012 9:11 pm

Hi all,

My two divisions (kindly set up this way by Stefan to make my task a bit easier) started off in the bottom left corner of the map and we moved quickly, along two road routes, to John's Creek Mountain. We then started to hear artillery fire and heard from General Ord that the enemy were in strength to the NE of Newcastle. As we were still about an hour's march away, we started quick-marching, with all the inherent dangers [if you want to change your orders, you can't, as the couriers can't catch up with galloping officers]. It was not long before I heard that "the enemy holds the field" and Niall and I decided to press on as we had not heard any official surrender.

I went off ahead of my troops and eventually met Martin J near NewCastle, who filled me in on the battle so far and said he thought the main body of the enemy could be getting away to the West. I then sent orders to my division to head thataway, asked Niall to do the same and galloped as hard as I could a long way along the John's Creek Road. I saw the odd Reb courier and should have kept going until I saw the enemy. By this point, my judgement was worsened by the frustrations of not playing a part in the battle and by the foibles of the courier system [ie, following roads when they shouldn't, riding smack into the enemy and the maddening inability to catch galloping officers]. Anyway, I turned back just too soon (I think) and headed back to the Penny Hollow area. I *wish* I could claim credit for my troop's brilliant trap for Khryses but, unfortunately, I had no idea about this until you mentioned it!!!

While I really appreciate the cleverness of the scenario, its realism and the nervousness engendered by the possibility of our appearing on the scene, from my POV, it was enormously frustrating, as it felt that there was nothing Niall or I could have done differently to effect the outcome. I think we may have been a bit too far away, Stefan. OTOH, perhaps on a different occasion it could play out differently.

Looking forward to the next one, but I request that Niall and I are excused distant commands that might not get into the fight!

Regards,

Jeff
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Leffe7 on Mon May 28, 2012 9:59 pm

Falling into a trap, 26th May - General Martins AAR (CSA)

According to the battle plan of General Price, it was my brigade's task to be the left flank of our attack on Ords division. In the center to my right was General Green (Baldwin). Shortly after reaching the vicinity of New Castle, I could see Union regiments marching our way. Thanks to our cavalry scouts, I could see the enemy while my troops should still be invisible to them at that time.



As my orders were to attack without delay I continued to march to the north and to get in a attacking position. I informed General Green that I would leave enough space between us, so both our brigades could fully deploy into battle lines. As the most forward Union regiments (still in marching column!) were litterally stumbling into Confederate soldiers near New Castle a Meeting Engagement began and from my observation it was a pretty messy on both sides.


To my surprise and inconvenience General Green had stopped his advance to help defend our center against the lead Union regiments. This meant that I lost contact with the rest of our division and was really cut off. But I could see 3 regiments of our cavalry in my rear at least. I decided to close the distance to the enemy to force the enemy to deploy troops on his right flank and possibly weaken his other fronts for our attacks. The terrain was rising to the north so I had to march to the northeast to be at least on par with the enemy and I didn't want to fight uphill. I had 3 regiments deployed and 1 in reserve. About 4 large Federal regiments were deploying in my front and the battle begun. I was opposing General Laumann (kgsspoom) and he held his ground bravely and covered the Federal artillery which was deploying only a little bit in his rear on a little plateau. The battle withered back and forth as single regiments had to withdraw, rally and rejoin the fight on both sides. My men were also targeted by the Union artillery and after some time 2 of my regiments took enough beating and routed to my discontent. I had to withdraw a bit to rally my remaining men. Shortly after that our brave cavalry under General Armstrong joined the fight and charged to my right. They were pretty successful, routing some of the shaken Federal regiments and captured some guns. The timing was not the best, as a combined attack would have proved even more successfull I think. When Armstrong had to retreat himself, I joined the fight against Laumann again but kept a healthy distance to the enemy artillery.


As I was unable to advance with my limited forces I was pleased to see that our center and the right flank advanced successfully, driving the enemy back and capturing most of his guns. General Hebert (Cob4thTexas) earned much credit in this attack.
When the signal to disengage came, I lead the way of our division towards Nutters Mountain/Big Branch/Lugar. Being ever ready to spot Rosecrans' division I was relieved as we reached Big Branch without any problems. At some time I could see a single Union cavalry shadowing us in the north, but they didn't pose a real threat. The surviving Confederate soldiers found good ground and prepared a strong position if we would be attacked.


Our position was scouted by Union General Veatch (Martin) of Ord's division but his troops were nowhere to be seen. Honorable General Price decided to ride forward to have a chat with Veatch, perhaps they were old friends from West Point? I dont know... Rolling Eyes


After a bloody fight with too many losses on our side, the sun finally was setting and the surviving men escaped in the night.

Your most humble servant,
Col. John D. Martin
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Leffe7 on Mon May 28, 2012 10:15 pm

Blaugrana wrote:I think we may have been a bit too far away, Stefan. OTOH, perhaps on a different occasion it could play out differently.

Looking forward to the next one, but I request that Niall and I are excused distant commands that might not get into the fight!

I'm really sorry Jeff, that you and Niall weren't able to join the main fight in time (as historical as it might be...).
As this was the first run of this scenario I couldn't foresee how it would develop. The map is really larger than you might think initially and if you take a wrong valley you might miss the battle. With the reduced visibility scouting became even more important. If we replay this one I will surely alter some minor things. Feedback is always welcome. MTG mentioned the cavalry to be too strong - maybe lowering their numbers would help.

Khryses wrote:
-What's next? A replay through the campaign, or does Leffe have some more excellent mischief up his sleeve? Thanks again for inviting me to this, I very much enjoy this style of play.
Yes, I have scheduled a replay of the campaign (Supply Lines next), as I can't produce new scenarios each week Wink
The scenarios will be altered a little, so they should still provide some fog of war even if you have played it before (as Martin J. suggested).
I envisage at least one more scenario in this storyline...
In the meantime, Digbys campaign will also produce the first battles soon, so stay tuned for that.
KR
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Martin on Mon May 28, 2012 11:30 pm

Many thanks to Stefan for another entertaining scenario. The report of Brig Gen James C Veatch on the latest action follows.

Camp at Penny Hollow, August 19th 1862.

Intelligence on the whereabouts of Price’s command was lacking, and General Ord gave instructions for our division to march in the first instance SW to Newcastle and then W along John’s Creek Road to Penny Hollow. My brigade had the honour of leading this advance.

I rode a few hundred yards ahead of my men and was about half a mile from Newcastle, on Marshalltown Road, when I spotted a senior Confederate officer. This proved to be General Armstrong, whom I of course recognised by his red nose and trademark hip flask. Shortly thereafter a strong regiment of rebel cavalry appeared from the west and immediately bore down upon the 3rd Iowa, which was guarding the northern flank of the remainder of my brigade who were in column-of-route on the main road. Seeing that there was no time to bring other troops in support, I galloped to the 3rd Iowa to ensure they were in an appropriate formation, and also to exhort them in the struggle to come. In the event they held, and drove off the enemy 2nd Arkansas Cavalry in fine style. I was fortunate that this unit, although small, was a seasoned regiment, unlike the bulk of my brigade.

The enemy cavalry reformed quickly however, moved around to our right rear, and were evidently intent on charging one of our batteries which was following my brigade along Marshalltown Road. I therefore detached my rearmost regiment to assist the guns. I must give credit to Armstrong for this manoeuvre, which certainly disrupted our deployment.

While all this was happening, my leading regiments had entered Newcastle. I could see smoke from the village, and deduced they were engaged, so rode forward to join them. On arrival, I discovered they were in action against a much superior enemy force of infantry, cavalry and artillery who, moreover, held the high ground SW of the village. We could clearly neither go forward, nor stay where we were, so I brought up my rear regiments as a second line, and ordered those in advance to fall back out of Newcastle and rally behind them. This we managed to do, and I was grateful to see that General Ord had meanwhile ordered up the Provisional Brigade under Colonel Scott to support our left, which was by now under threat of envelopment.

The enemy pressed us hard however, and much of my time was taken riding from regiment to regiment, in an attempt to bolster their morale. In this I was only partially successful, as most of the brigade was poorly trained, and I spent the next 20 minutes or so rallying first one unit and then another as they broke for the rear. We were able to maintain a line however until the Provisional Brigade collapsed, exposing our left flank once again, and carrying away the 3rd Iowa, whom I had sent to support them. I sent word to General Ord, explained that Scott’s Brigade was disappearing into the wild blue yonder, and requesting reinforcements. He pointed-out that they were the reinforcements!

I could see that our remaining infantry brigade, under Brig Gen Lauman, was also under severe pressure, and realised that I could look for no help there. At General Ord’s suggestion, I attempted to disengage again, and fall back on our guns, which had taken a good position on a small eminence to our rear. This proved difficult with mostly green troops, but I eventually managed to collect some men to support our artillery. The 32nd Illinois repulsed a bayonet charge, and the green 41st Illinois then did likewise. The enemy were too numerous however, and a few of our guns were eventually taken. By this time both my remaining regiments were very tired, and Lauman and I pulled back further to the NE during a lull in the fighting.

We soon realised that the enemy were withdrawing, and General Ord invited me to move my brigade forward, alongside that of Lauman. My boys’ morale was by now somewhat shaky, but honour required me to comply. The enemy main body was by now no longer in view, and Lauman and I retook some of our guns.

No word had yet been received from General Rosecrans, so with General Ord’s permission, I then rode ahead to the high ground SW of Newcastle to observe. From there I was able to see masses of blue troops in the direction of Aps Knob. A senior Union officer was soon spotted approaching at the gallop, and I cantered forward to meet him.

It transpired that this was Gen Rosecrans, the victor of Iuka. I was naturally intrigued to meet an officer of such renown, and he did not disappoint, having the piercing eyes and firm bone structure of a man of enterprise and character. I briefed him on events in our sector, and took it upon myself to speculate that Price’s main body had retreated west. I further ventured to suggest that Rosecrans should direct his force NW to have the best chance of cutting them off. I was pleased that the General indulged my forwardness and expressed the intention to attempt this.

I of course reported this news to General Ord who, somewhat to my relief, approved my actions. He forthwith ordered my small brigade to move west in pursuit of the rebels, again alongside Lauman. With his permission, I once more rode ahead of my troops, and discovered an enemy supply train moving W along John’s Creek. Riding further ahead, I finally discovered Price’s main body drawn-up behind Big Branch. I naturally sent back a detailed description to both Generals Ord and Rosecrans.

Whilst making my reconnaissance, I had the misfortune to come within hailing distance of General Price - a rakish looking rogue with a grim countenance and evil leer. He had the effrontery to request my surrender, which as a Bostonian and a gentleman, I could not in all conscience give. I told him this most plainly, and flounced off (rather splendidly I thought) eastwards in the direction of Nutter’s Mountain, where I could see the brave banners of my regiments had just appeared on the sky-line.

At this point a sudden burst of rain, together with the growing darkness, brought operations to a halt. That evening I had the pleasure of joining my officers for a most excellent campfire supper of pancakes, wild bilberries and black-eyed peas. Many a toast to brave General Ord was drunk.

Martin

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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Khryses on Tue May 29, 2012 6:15 am

Leffe7 wrote:
Khryses wrote:
-What's next? A replay through the campaign, or does Leffe have some more excellent mischief up his sleeve? Thanks again for inviting me to this, I very much enjoy this style of play.
Yes, I have scheduled a replay of the campaign (Supply Lines next), as I can't produce new scenarios each week Wink
The scenarios will be altered a little, so they should still provide some fog of war even if you have played it before (as Martin J. suggested).
I envisage at least one more scenario in this storyline...
In the meantime, Digbys campaign will also produce the first battles soon, so stay tuned for that.
KR

How do you go about writing a campaign, tool-wise?

I have written a number of gaming scenarios before, and would be curious about how to adapt them to SoW.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Mr. Digby on Tue May 29, 2012 10:23 am

Camp west of Newcastle, Miss.
May 7, 1862

General P.G.T.Beauregard

General, about the motions taken by the corps under my command in its operations from May 5 to May 7, I beg leave to report as follows:

Further to my despatch of the 5th inst. relating the action at Iuka I am pleased to advise that I was able to send forwards the captured supply wagons without further hindrance from General Rosecrans and I put this down to the losses taken by his cavalry forces under Colonel Mizner which we roughly handled in their charge upon our withdrawing guns on the Corinth Road west of Iuka on the late afternoon of the 5th.

I regret to advise that Gen'l Little was wounded at the end of the action of the 5th. Not a debilitating wound but a ball in the leg which prevented him riding or walking. I thus made arrangements for him to be conveyed as comfortably as was practical, along with our supply wagons.

My corps then began a steady withdrawal westwards but it was seen that Genl Rosecrans and his infantry under Gen'l Hamilton were in pursuit, though not closely, and by the 7th we had opened up a gap of several hours march. Once again I wish to commend Gen'l Armstrong whose cavalry were prominent in keeping Hamilton at arm's length.

At a place near here called Newcastle I was advised that a further Union Corps under a General Ord, was marching south to meet up with Hamilton's force and thus trap us between the two. My intelligence reported that Ord was weaker than my column and thus I conferred with my five brigade commanders and resolved to press on with all haste and force, locate Ord, pin him in place with a cavalry feint and then crush him quickly with all the application I could draw, before moving west into the hills around Peter's Ridge and Nutter's Mountain.

To my great delight I did indeed encounter Ord's advancing column at said township of Newcastle, not more than a hamlet of a half-dozen houses and sited north of a farm owned by a Mr Britt. There was some confusion with deployments and I regret to advise that Gen'l Martin who was to be my left flank in a contiguous line, took his brigade too far north and west and became isolated from my main body. Martin subsequently suffered heavy losses facing about half of the enemy column.

The enemy initially deployed among the houses of the township and Gen Green's brigade with support from Gen. Gates' brigade on his right advanced. I deployed my artillery on the moderate bluff of high ground that is prominent south of Newcastle but after a short exchange of musketry and a cannonade of just a few minutes the enemy infantry melted away northwards, abandoning the town.

I ordered Gen'l Green and Gen'l Gates to push on through the village and ordered the artillery forwards. At this time I observed several extremely gallant and successful charges by Armstrong's cav'ry which were steadfastly made into the face of deployed enemy infantry in order to try and support Gen'l Martin. Armstrong's boys captured several hundred prisoners and two pairs of colors but suffered grave losses, many more than they had at Iuka.

For the next half-hour the action became general, with the enemy being slowly pushed back north onto a low mound about a third-mile north of the township. Gen'l Hebert manouvered his reserve brigade around Gates' right and struck the enemy with full force, sending in charges to capture several guns. I wish to commend both Gen'l Green and Gen'l Hebert for their steadfast and aggressive attacks and the capture between them of twelve enemy cannon.

Our own losses were not trivial, with some six regiments from Martin's, Green's and Hebert's brigades being quite put out of action, Armstrong's cavalry blown, but his brigade still active in part. The enemy which I estimate consisted of 12 regiments of infantry in three brigades, 12 guns in two batteries and a regiment of cavalry, were reduced to five infantry regiments and the cavalry.

I regret to advise that Gen'l Gates did not play his full part. I repeatedly ordered him to advance with Green's and Hebert's men but he deemed it necessary to manouevre his soldiers in large turning and sweeping marches away from the action and around the village gardens. I have dealt with Gen Gates and was shocked to confiscate from his personal wagon a large quantity of table silver.

At this juncture the enemy drew off some way to the north-east and having no word of how close Gen'l Hamilton now was, I had to forego bringing up my artillery to the mound and bombarding the enemy into submission and instead ordered a planned withdrawal to the west. With the horse teams killed and scattered we could not bring the captured guns with us and I ordered them spiked.

Our withdrawal was conducted smoothly and without further interruption although I did sight the Union cav. on top of Nutter's Mountain later in the evening. I withdrew my Corps across the Big Branch and continued marching west into the night.

Gen Armstrong had taken his cavalry brigade on a more southerly route and kept me appraised of any sightings of which he made several as Gen Hamilton's column was at last contacted west of App's Knob and on the trails leading north therefrom. His cavalry in addition captured two more supply wagons, from Gen Ord and from Genl Hamilton's column which he sent to my main body and which were sufficient to replenish our expended ammunition and provide blankets for the men and our many prisoners.

I am, general, most respectfully, and would wish to remain, your humble servant,

Sterling Price

Major-General, Army of Missouri.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Uncle Billy on Tue May 29, 2012 6:37 pm

First Division camp at New Castle, Miss. May29, 1862.


Major General Ulysses S. Grant:

I have the honor to submit the following report of the action of this command in the battle at New Castle on the 26th instant. Most of the day had been spent moving the division west from Marshalltown. About dusk, Gen. Veatch's brigade reached the outskirts of the small village of New Castle, where my division had planned to spend the night. There he found a portion of Gen Armstrong's cavalry. The enemy rashly attacked the 3rd Iowa and were driven back with substantial loss. The cavalry then attacked Lt. Nichols' battery which was in column behind Gen. Veatch's brigade. The enemy managed to destroy one gun before they were driven away by Veatch's men.

A portion of Veatch's brigade advanced through the town where they ran into the lead elements of the rebel infantry. Gen Veatch wisely withdrew to the northeast outskirts of the village where he set up a defensive line, forcing the enemy to try and deploy as they exited the town. I quickly sent off several couriers to alert Gen. Rosecrans' of our discovery, but unexplainably, they tried to force their way through the enemy lines. I do not believe any made it to Gen. Rosecrans. By this time, Gen. Lauman's brigade was up and supported Gen. Veatch's right. Lt. Nichols' battery moved into line with Veatch's men and the batteries of Lt. Atwood and Capt. Cohen moved to a small hill directly behind Gen. Lauman's brigade.

At this time an isolated enemy brigade advanced on Lauman and the artillery. These men were roughly handled and they retreated in some haste. By this time the enemy on Gen. Veatch's front were disentangling themselves from the town and were extending beyond our left. Col. Scott's provisional brigade was sent to this sector and the left was stabilized.

I was about to order Gen. Lauman to break off the action with the remnant of rebel infantry left at his front and begin flanking the main body of the enemy. At this moment a most extraordinary event took place, not seen since the charge of the Scot Greys at Waterloo. Several regiments of rebel cavalry massed in full view of our artillery and then charged Gen. Lauman's left-most regiments. Concentrated artillery fire had no effect upon them and as our men are not practiced in the drill of forming a square, two of our regiments were driven off before the cavalry withdrew. In light of these events, I strongly recommend that you equip and make available to each division two regiments of cuirassiers to thwart this new enemy tactic.

As Gen. Lauman was no longer able to assist Gen Veatch's men and the enemy brought still another brigade out beyond our left, I ordered Gen. Veatch to withdraw to the hill with our battery emplacements. Col. Scott and his infantry were left in place to delay the enemy while Gen Veatch successfully disengaged from the enemy and established a new line at the hill. Col. Scott's infantry were overwhelmed but the sacrifice allowed Gen Veatch the time needed to withdraw.

With the artillery in position to closely support our infantry, the combination of canister and rifle fire routed a number of enemy regiments. In desperation, the enemy resorted to charging the hill. This compelled both generals Veatch and Lauman to withdraw to the next hill to the west. The guns were fought to the last and five were captured by the enemy and all but one of the others routed.

Our troops soon regrouped and were about to advance and sweep the rebels from the hill we had just vacated when the enemy seeing our determination and realizing that what little was left of their command would be either captured or destroyed, wisely decided to withdraw as fast as they could to the northwest. The 5th Ohio cavalry was sent to shadow the enemy as they fled and to sweep up any stragglers they encountered.

The infantry quickly regained the hill and recaptured the guns, but the enemy had spiked them so they were temporarily unusable. As I still had heard no word from Gen Rosecrans, I decided to send our infantry to pursue the enemy. Though tired, all to a man were determined to finish the grim work of this day. As there were many casualties littering the field, I left the division's medical staff including my personal surgeon to render what comfort they could to the brave men of both sides in this fight.

The division proceeded cross country northwest towards Nutter mountain. The path of the enemy was easy to follow, even in the waning light as a trail of silverware gave evidence to their hasty passing. At this time, Gen Veatch made contact with Gen Rosecrans and his column coming over the knob of Ap. He informed the general of the days events and pointed the direction of the fleeing enemy. Gen. Rosecrans ordered his men to pursue, but by this time darkness had descended and no more could be done this day.

This victory, though costly to my division, having suffered over 1700 men dead, wounded or missing, effectively destroyed the enemy force operating in this area. We counted in excess of 1900 enemy casualties or captures. My men will require several days rest and refit, but in such time they will be ready to continue cleansing the area of this perfidious rebellion.

I await the general's further orders at this location.


I am, sir, your obedient servant,

Major General Edward O. C. Ord Commanding

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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Mr. Digby on Tue May 29, 2012 7:12 pm

Very nicely written!
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

Post  Blaugrana on Tue May 29, 2012 7:39 pm

Great AARs - thanks to all the authors.
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Re: MP Scenario 3: Falling into a trap (26th may)

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