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Campaign Rules

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Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Sun May 05, 2013 12:33 pm

RULES

PLEASE NOTE! 13th JULY 2014, MAP UPDATED AGAIN. Please re-download and delete original. I have added several additional rivers and included secondary roads.

Here is the map - it is subject to change however as I learn more about this crazy war. I'll just add the link rather than the actual image here due to size.

Warning! Enormous!

http://www.atomic-album.com/showPic.php/22426/Spain-Rivers-Huge-02.jpg

Rules - a work in progress and subject to change. I also welcome ideas and input. The campaign can use around 9 players per side just on commanding the map armies so there is plenty of room for more to join.

Scourge of War - Napoleon. Peninsular Campaign Rules

1.0 Map Notes


1.1 Map Scale

The map is 15 miles per hex.

1.2 Map Legend

Black-outlined white diamond = Village or Minor Town
Black dot = Town
Black star = Fortress Town
Red dot = City
Red star = Fortress City
Anchor icon = Port
Wheel icon = Depot
Brown line = Militarily useful road
Broken brown line = Secondary road
Blue line = River providing significant military obstacle. Crossable only where intersected by road
White/yellow areas = Low lying land or farmland traversable off road by military forces
Orange/brown areas = Higher ground or mountain traversable off road by military forces only with difficulty. Impassable to artillery.

2.0 Settlements

2.1 Friendly settlements

2.1.1 France

France is considered the invader thus all places on the map south of the Pyrenees are hostile to her unless adequately garrisoned and policed. Once adequately garrisoned a settlement becomes 'friendly'.

To convert a settlement from hostile to friendly a town or fortress-town must be held by at least 1 unit; a city or fortress-city must be held by at least 1 brigade; a capital city by at least 1 division. A port requires 1 additional unit. These levels of garrison and policing will ensure adequately peaceful population response and provide 'adequate' supply production and tax income.

Doubling these garrisons will generate 'good' levels of supply production and tax income.

North of the Pyrenees all settlements are friendly to the French. Garrisons in towns are not necessary. In cities 1 unit is needed. Marked ports require 1 additional unit to be kept securely policed. Doubling these garrison strengths will convert 'adequate' supply production to 'good'.

A unit is 1 infantry battalion or 1 dragoon cavalry squadron. Brigades must be a minimum of 3 infantry battalions or 2 dragoon cavalry regiments (4 squadrons). Other cavalry are not able to garrison settlements.

2.1.2 The Allies

Spain, Portugal and Britain are considered to be members of one alliance. All settlements south of the Pyrenees not garrisoned by the French and not in a state of civil unrest (a (-) symbol beside the name below) are considered friendly and garrisons in towns are not necessary. In fortress-towns and cities 1 unit is needed and in fortress-cities and capitals, 1 brigade. Marked ports require 1 additional unit to be kept securely garrisoned and policed. This level of garrisoning will generate 'adequate' supply production. Doubling these garrison strengths will convert 'adequate' supply production to 'good'. Note that for 'good' supply status each town must be garrisoned by 1 unit.

North of the Pyrenees all settlements are hostile to the Allies unless garrisoned at the following levels. A town or fortress-town must be held by at least 1 unit; an occupied city or fortress-city must be held by at least 1 brigade; a port requires 1 additional unit. These levels of garrison will ensure adequately peaceful population response and provide 'adequate' supply production. Doubling these garrison levels will generate 'good' supply production.

At the start of the campaign the Spanish capital of Madrid is occupied by the French, therefore the principal provincial capital of Andalusia, Seville is regarded as their temporary capital. Should Seville be captured, Cádiz is considered the temporary capital.

A unit is 1 infantry battalion or 1 dragoon cavalry squadron. Brigades must be a minimum of 3 infantry battalions or 2 dragoon cavalry regiments (4 squadrons). Other cavalry are not able to garrison settlements.

2.1.3 Villages and Minor Towns

Black-outlined white diamonds represent small settlements of insignificant military or taxable value such as hamlets, villages or small towns. They do not need garrisons. They do not provide sufficient resources and overhead cover to afford troops protection from the elements during winter and forces located in them may suffer attrition.

Their presence on the map often occurs at river crossings and road junctions and their primary purpose is to aid players in issuing orders and other instructions - giving better clarity of orientation.

2.2 Spanish Provincial Armies and Supply

The Spanish army though based on a national model, is required to use provincial bases due to its dispositions prior to the war of being placed mostly around her coastline to defend against expected British raids. For much of the conflict the interests of the commanding generals will bear more focus towards political and local concerns than national. The central French position obliges the Spanish armies to draw men and material from, and rely on supply bases in, their own province. All provinces other than Extremadura have coastlines and it is through their ports that British material flows. This, too, adds to the tendency for the Spanish armies to act like the spokes of a wheel, linked to the wheel's rim and attempting to extend their influence towards the hub. Communications in such circumstances are not always good. Clockwise the Spanish provinces are:

Galicia - in the north-west, capital Santiago de Compostela
Asturias - in the north, capital Oviedo
Cantabria - in the north, capital Santander
Leon and Old Castile - in the north centre, capital Valladolid
Vascongadas - in the north-east capital Vitoria
Navarra - in the north-east capital Pamplona
Aragon - in the north east, capital Zaragosa
Cataluña - in the east, east of Aragon, capital Barcelona
Valencia - in the south east, capital Valencia
Murcia - in the south, west of Valencia, capital Murcia
New Castile-La Mancha - in the south centre, capital Toledo
Andalucía - in the south, capital Seville
Extremadura - in the west centre, east of Portugal, capital Mérida

The smaller northern provinces; Cantabria, Vascongadas (Basque Region) and Navarra (which do not have active Spanish armies initially) aside, each of these will produce and support its own army(ies) which must draw supply lines back to their own supply depots.

Forces may become active in the above-mentioned provinces after the campaign begins.

2.3 Hostile Settlements

Any settlement that is not friendly is hostile (including those in a state of civil unrest but not friendly to the enemy) and any supply line drawn through it is considered cut.

2.4 Settlement List. List Updated to Early October 1808

2.4.1 Capitals

Lisbon (also a port) 02.29 (Br)
Madrid 29.21 (Sp)

2.4.2 Open Cities

Malaga - Andalucia (also a port) 26.41 (-)
Mérida - Extremadura 16.29 (Sp)
Murcia - Murcia 42.34 (Sp)
Oviedo - Asturias 19.04 (Sp)
Santander - Cantabria (also a port) 29.04 (Sp)
Seville - Andalucía 17.37 (Sp)
Toledo - Castile-La Mancha 28.23 (Fr) but invested by (Sp)
Toulouse - France 53.03 (Fr)
Valladolid - Leon and Old Castile 24.13 (Sp)
Vitoria - Vascongadas 34.07 (Fr)

2.4.3 Fortress Cities

Almeida 14.18 (Po)
Badajoz 13.29 (Sp)
Barcelona (also a port) 58.14 (Sp)
Burgos 30.09 (Fr)
Cádiz (also a port) 16.42 (Sp)
Cartagena (also a port) 43.36 (Sp)
Ciudad Rodrigo 16.19 (Sp)
Figueras 61.09 (Fr)
Gerona 60.11 (Sp)
Gibraltar (also a port) 20.44 (Br)
Oporto (also a port) 06.15 (Po)
Pamplona 39.08 (Sp) but invested by (Fr)
San Sebastian (also a port) 38.04 (Fr)
Santiago 07.06 (Sp)
Tarragona (also a port) 53.17 (Sp)
Valencia (also a port) 46.26 (Sp)
Zaragosa 43.14 (Fr)

2.4.4 Fortress Towns

Astorga 18.09 (Sp)
Bayonne (also a port) 40.03 (Fr)
Elvas 12.28 (Po)
Lerida 50.13 (Sp)
Perpignan 60.07 (Fr)
Rosas (also a port) 61.10 (Fr)
Tarifa 19.45 (-)
Vigo (also a port) 06.09 (Sp)

2.4.5 Ports

Alicante 45.32 (Sp)
Barcelona (also a fortress city) 58.14 (Sp)
Bayonne 40.03 (Fr)
Bilbao 33.04 (Fr)
Cádiz (also a fortress city) 16.42 (Sp)
Cartagena (also a fortress city) 43.36 (Sp)
La Corunna 08.03 (Sp)
Dénia 48.29 (-)
Faro 08.38 (-)
El Ferrol 08.02 (Sp)
Gibraltar (also a fortress city) 20.44 (Br)
Lagos 04.38 (-)
Lisbon (also a capital) 02.29 (Br)
Malaga (also a city) 26.41 (-)
Narbonne 61.04 (Fr)
Oporto (also a fortress city) 06.15 (Po)
Rosas (also a fortress town) 61.10 (Fr)
San Sebastian (also a fortress city) 38.04 (Fr)
Santander (also a city) 29.04 (Sp)
Setubal 03.30 (-)
Tarragona (also a fortress city) 53.17 (Sp)
Valencia (also a fortress city) 46.26 (Sp)
Vianna 05.13 (-)
Vigo (also a fortress town) 06.09 (Sp)
Villa de Conde 05.15 (-)

2.4.6 Open Towns

Abrantes 07.25 (Br)
Aire 44.00 (Fr)
Alba de Tormes 21.18 (Sp)
Albuera 14.30 (Sp)
Alcala 31.20 (Sp)
Alcaniz, 47.17 (Fr)
Alcántara 13.24 (Sp)
Alhandra 03.28 (Po)
Alicante (also a port) 45.32 (Sp)
Algeciras 20.44 (-)
Almaden 23.30 (-)
Almanza 42.29 (-)
Almaraz 20.23 (Sp)
Andorra 54.08 (-)
Aranda 30.13 (Sp)
Aranjuez 30.22 (Sp)
Arzobispo 22.24 (Sp)
Auch 49.01 (Fr)
Bailén 29.34 (Sp)
Barrosa 16.43 (-)
Belanzos 09.04 (Sp)
Benavente 20.11 (Sp)
Bilbao (also a port) 33.04 (Fr)
Braga 07.14 (Po)
Bragança 14.12 (-)
Brihuega 33.19 (Sp)
Bucellas 02.28 (Po)
Busaco 07.20 (Po)
Cacabellos 15.08 (Sp)
Calatayud 39.15 (Fr)
Carcassone 57.04 (Fr)
Castelo Branco 10.23 (Br)
Celorico 11.19 (Br)
Cervera 53.14 (Sp)
Chaves 11.12 (-)
Ciudad Real 28.28 (Sp)
Coimbra 06.20 (Po)
Córdoba 23.35 (Sp)
La Corunna (also a port) 08.03 (Sp)
Cuenca 37.23 (Sp)
Daix 42.01 (Fr)
Dénia (also a port) 48.29 (-)
Espinosa 30.05 (Fr)
Evora 08.30 (Po)
Faro (also a port) 08.38 (-)
Fuentes de Onoro 14.19 (Br)
El Ferrol (also a port) 08.02 (Sp)
Granada 29.39 (Sp)
Guadalajara 32.19 (Sp)
Irun 39.04 (Fr)
Lagos (also a port) 04.38 (-)
Lamego 09.16 (Br)
Leiria 04.23 (Po)
Leon 21.08 (Sp)
Lessar 46.02 (Fr)
Llerena 18.32 (Sp)
Lombez 50.04 (Fr)
Lugo 11.06 (Sp)
Manresa 56.12 (Sp)
Manzanares 31.29 (Sp)
Medina del Rio Seco 23.12 (Sp)
Medellin 18.28 (Sp)
Miranda 17.14 (-)
Miranda del Ebro 33.08 (Fr)
Narbonne (also a port) 61.04 (Fr)
Ocaña 30.23 (Sp)
Orthez 44.03 (Fr)
Pamiers 57.06 (Fr)
Plasencia 18.22 (Sp)
Pombal 05.22 (Po)
Ponterrada 16.08 (Sp)
Pontevedra 06.08 (Sp)
Requena 42.25 (Sp)
Reynosa 25.05 (Fr)
Rieux 52.05 (Fr)
Ronda 22.41 (-)
Sabugal 12.20 (Br)
Sahagún 23.10 (Sp)
Salamanca 20.17 (Sp)
Saldanha 24.08 (Sp)
Segovia 27.18 (-)
Setubal (also a port) 03.30 (-)
Somosierra 30.16 (Sp)
Taboa 09.20 (-)
Talavera 24.23 (Sp)
Tarbes 47.06 (Fr)
Teruel 43.20 (-)
Thomar 06.24 (Po)
Torres Vedras 02.27 (Br)
Tortosa 50.18 (Sp)
Tudela 39.12 (Sp)
Trujillo 19.26 (Sp)
Valls 53.16 (Sp)
Vianna (also a port) 05.13 (-)
Villa de Conde (also a port) 05.15 (-)
Villa Viçiosa 10.29 (Po)
Villa Viciosa 33.18 (Sp)
Villafranca 15.08 (Sp)
Villena 44.30 (-)
Vimeiro 02.26 (Br)
Vizeu 09.19 (Br)
Xerès 16.41 (Sp)
Zafra 15.32 (Sp)
Zamora 19.14 (Sp)

2.4.8 Notes

(Fr), (Sp), (Po) or (Br) denotes to whom the settlement is friendly. I adjust this list each game turn so the current picture is available. For settlements to be friendly to France, they must be garrisoned, as must any settlement larger than a non-port town for the Allies. A notation of (-) indicates the settlement is not controlled by either side but is in a state of civil unrest and unfriendly to all.

2.5 Fortress-Towns and Fortress-Cities

The differentiation between these two settlement types rests on the minimum garrison which can hold it against a siege.

2.5.1

A fortress-town is a smaller settlement sometimes with only a citadel, or a relatively weak ring of smaller forts or second grade/older defences. It requires a minimum strength garrison of 500 men to hold it against a siege. The maximum garrison a fortress-town may hold is 10,000 men.

2.5.2

A fortress-city is a much larger and stronger defended place, often with extensive outworks and bastions or a continuous or nearly continuous Vauban wall. It requires a minimum strength garrison of 2,000 men to hold it against a siege. A fortress-city has no maximum garrison capacity.

2.5.3 Toledo

This city is a special case. It is not a fortress but has a fortified citadel - the Alcazar. This citadel must be invested or besieged in the usual way. Any supply depot established in Toledo or source of supply originating from the city is considered to always be in the Alcazar. The Alcazar must therefore be controlled to draw supplies from Toledo. Investing it allows otherwise normal movement through and a supply line to pass through the city. The Alcazar has minimum and maximum troop capacities equivalent to a fortress-town. In effect these rules treat the Alcazar as a fortified town inside an open city.

Toledo lies in the south-western corner of hex 28.23. Due to unique physical features here, the city is considered to be entirely on the north bank of the Tagus and only one bridge is present which leads from 28.23 into 28.24. To access the western road (in 27.24) a military force must pass first into 28.24 then into 27.24 moving along the south bank of the river.

In addition the geography and strong defences at the river crossing (Puente de Alacantara) are such that NO CROSSING between 28.23 and 28.24 is allowed if there are enemy forces of at least brigade strength in the other hex.

There are other crossings in open country west of the city which connect 27.24 to 28.23 directly and these do not pass significantly close to the city. However there is no 'map road' at these crossings so cross country movement will be needed.

The Toledo end of Puente de Alacantara with fortified tower and further fortifications behind:

http://www.visit-medieval-spain.com/Photos-Toledo-Spain/Puente-de-Alacantara-Bridge-Toledo.jpg

The Almonacid end, with fortifications above:

http://www.dpeck.info/pictures/cities/toledo2012-b08.jpg

Note how narrow it is, just about room for two wagons to pass:

http://thumbs.dreamstime.com/x/old-bridge-toledo-13006809.jpg

3.0 Supply Lines

3.1 Effect of Supply Lines

Military forces must draw a supply line from their present location back along a road to a supply source in order to advance closer to any enemy. They may hold in position (for a limited period) or withdraw back along their supply line if it is cut. In battles expended ammunition will not be replaced and stragglers returning after battles (mainly from routed and captured units) will be fewer for a force that is out of supply.

3.2 Defining Supply Lines

Allied forces may draw a supply line along a road of any length to a capital, city, fortress-city, garrisoned marked port or garrisoned marked depot via friendly settlements.

French forces may draw a supply line along a road of any length to a capital, city, fortress-city or garrisoned marked depot via friendly settlements.

Note that only the Allies may consider garrisoned ports as supply points. This is a representational effect of command of the sea by the Royal Navy.

3.2.1 Depots

Each French Corps Commander (Player) and each Allied Army (Spanish or Anglo-Portuguese) may place one depot on the map at a settlement within the area they control (Spanish province, or Portugal for the Allies, controlled zone of Spain for the French).

Depots cannot move and can form an additional supply line source.

3.2.1.1 Depot Recruits

New forces within that Province or Corps area will arrive at/be raised at the marked Depot.

If a Depot is captured, all supplies from it and new recruits are lost until it is recaptured.

It takes a French Corps 6 weeks (3 turns) to establish a new Depot. Anglo-Portuguese and Spanish armies cannot establish new Depots but must retake their existing ones. Upon recapture it takes Allied corps/armies 2 months (4 turns) to re-establish their depot.

3.3 Cutting and Re-Opening Supply Lines

If a settlement along a supply line is no longer friendly, that supply line is cut. Inadequate military supplies are now moving along the supply line, insufficient to support any military force.

Forces which have a cut supply line cannot advance towards a known enemy. They may hold in position (for a limited period) or withdraw. They must withdraw along the cut supply line to the point at which it is cut in order to re-open the supply line.

Friendly forces can reopen a cut supply line by ensuring that all settlements along it are friendly.

A force may exist at the head of a cut supply line for a maximum of 2 months (4 turns) after which time, if the supply line is not re-opened, it must retreat back along the supply line to the break and re-open it. In battles expended ammunition will not be replaced and stragglers returning after battles (mainly from routed and captured units) will be fewer for a force that is out of supply.

3.4 Adequate and Good Supply

A series of settlements, all of which meet the criteria to provide 'adequate' supply can provide a supply line sufficient to support a force of 25,000 men and 75 guns. A series of settlements at least 2/3rds of which meet the criteria to provide 'good' supply can provide a supply line sufficient to support a force of 50,000 men and 150 guns.

If a good supply line downgrades to adequate status due to lack of garrisons, a maximum of only 25,000 men and 75 guns may continue to be considered in supply from it. Any force in excess of this must halt or withdraw, as per the cut supply line rules, but may not conduct offensive operations.

3.5 French Line of Communications

The French must maintain an unbroken line of communications (not supply) between France and their forward armies in order for messages and replacement troops to reach their field armies and Depots. A Line of Supply needs to be drawn to a friendly supply depot, city or fortress-city (see rule 3.2) however, and in addition, French armies must be able to draw a similar line of communications all the way back to either Bayonne or Perpignan. If they cannot, they will not receive any communications from France nor any replacement troops. French field commanders will be advised if their LoC is cut.

Armies do not lose the ability to wage campaigns when suffering a cut LoC but they will not receive any replacement troops.

4.0 Money and Taxes

The French will collect taxes from any settlement in Spain or Portugal they garrison and police. They do not collect taxes in France (north of the Pyrenees).

The Allies do not collect taxes anywhere on the map. The Allies depend on British finance to support the war (there is local taxation but it is not relevant).

Each settlement providing good tax income to the French is checked once per month (every 2 turns). There is a 1 in 6 chance there will be a local revolt, general unrest or increased guerrilla activity. This state of affairs lasts 1 month and converts the settlement temporarily to hostile status. 1d6 x 5% (that is between 5% and 30% randomly) of the garrison will become casualties in that month after which the settlement reverts to adequate supply production and tax income. To increase it back to good supply production and tax income at least 1 fresh unit (infantry battalion or dragoon cavalry squadron) must be added to the garrison and policing force.

Each map turn, count the number of settlements producing taxes for the French.

If at least two thirds of the settlements in the area of the map controlled by the French are not providing at least adequate tax income then that turn the occupation counts as failing.

If at least two thirds of the settlements in the area of the map controlled by the French are providing at least adequate tax income then that turn the occupation counts as moderately successful.

If at least half of the settlements in the area of the map controlled by the French are providing good tax income then that turn the occupation counts as highly successful.

The French must be drawing taxes from at least 10 settlements. Less tax income than this counts as complete failure.

At the end of the year count up the number of turns of failed, moderate and highly successful campaigning. Failed turns count as -1. Moderately successful turns count as 0. Highly successful turns count as +1. Lost battles count as -1. Won battles count as +1. The French must generate a positive score, and must have won more battles than they have lost or drawn for their campaign in Spain to be considered successful. If the French are not successful by these criteria, then the Allies have won the campaign that year.

4.1 Effect of Winning or Losing a Campaign Season

Still not happy about this rule - Needs more work. Comments welcome.

After the first campaign year which ends at the end of Winter in February 1809 (18 turns) the side that was the most successful will have its historical reinforcements for 1809 boosted by 10%. The losing side will have them reduced by 10%

New raised forces and forces entering the Iberian Peninsular (French via the Pyrenees and British via Portugal or Gibraltar) will be based on historical levels with events elsewhere in Europe affecting what troops the French can commit, or must withdraw.

5.0 Forces and Political Situation

The campaign commences in June 1808. Joseph Bonaparte, brother of the Emperor, was declared King of Spain in April and is attempting to rule, from Madrid, with the help of considerable French forces, a kingdom that is mostly in revolt. Spanish armies are active in the field attempting to retake Madrid, break the supply lines of French field forces and recover lost Spanish settlements. The French occupy large areas of central and north-eastern Spain, and Portugal.

Britain - initially has no troops present. Forces will be landed ashore in Portugal later in the summer.
Portugal - initially the Portuguese army is suppressed by French occupation. If the British liberate Lisbon (or the French abandon it) this will allow the Portuguese army to be re-established using British money, uniforms, equipment and training. Some elements of the Portuguese military are staging a revolt, mostly in the north of the country.
Spain - initially there are powerful forces in the south (Andalucía) and in the north west (Galicia). Lesser armies are elsewhere, particularly on the east coast and in Aragon.
France - initially a 'Royal Spanish' army occupies Madrid. Lesser forces occupy Portugal and are there to suppress the Portuguese army and prevent it forming a useful force to assist the British. This army must also remain to suppress Portuguese trade with Britain. Significant forces are dispersed in north-eastern Spain to secure the supply line from Madrid to the Pyrenees and collect taxes. Other French armies lie near Madrid in support of King Joseph.
There is a British garrison at Gibraltar which has sufficient naval transport to be shifted to any friendly Spanish port.
Since their great victory at Trafalgar three years ago, British sea power dominates all the coasts of the Iberian peninsular allowing rapid and secure communications between the allies.
The French rely on a series of horse messenger posts in most towns from France into Spain. This is an efficient and reliable organisation but more susceptible to interception or delay by Spanish irregular forces. They must also draw all supplies overland, maritime trade is at the mercy of British warships.

The British have recently offered to support the Spanish, at first with money and military equipment such as cannon, uniforms and muskets, then with an army which they intend to land ashore in Portugal. The liberation of Lisbon will bring that country into the Alliance. British money will allow the rebuilding of the Portuguese army.

The Spanish are intent on retaking Madrid and driving the French out of Spain. Some local armies harbour only limited interests however.

Portugal has signed a treaty of alliance with Britain and in return for British money it will raise a new army and has offered to place that army under command of a British General to march into Spain in support of the Anglo-Spanish alliance.

5.1 The Provincial Juntas

For the first two map turns (June) Spanish armies may move as their commanding generals wish. At the beginning of turn 3 (July) the Provincial Juntas become organised, being based at each of the provincial capitals.

Civilian councils consisting of local nobles and notables, the Juntas, came into being in each province very quickly in the vacuum caused by the removal of the Bourbon monarchy and the refusal to recognise Joseph Bonaparte’s rule. Spain was left without any ruling or controlling body in any form.

The Juntas had control of taxation and import tariffs and thus the flow of money in their province. Military supplies, recruiting, the raising of new regiments and the appointment of officers and generals all therefore fell under their authority either directly or by simple leverage. There was considerable corruption and the aims of many Juntas were focused more on gaining power, prestige and influence for themselves and maintaining their own security than protecting wider Spanish interests or defeating the French. Many generals were mere puppets who were obliged to follow the Juntas often contradictory and strategically unsound orders.

There were two main political stances in the early Spanish rebellion. The legitimists supported the return to power of either the Bourbon monarchy – or any monarchy, possibly even a Bonaparte – or at the very least a return to the status quo in which the nobility, particularly the Provincial Captains General had control. The populist faction sought to fill the gulf left by the abdicated royal family with a regency and their aims were more liberalist and reformist with the view to reducing or annulling the power of the church and nobility. Game generals will be members of one of these two factions or be neutral. The Juntas would often scheme and plot against generals whose politics did not align with their own which resulted in poor strategy and significant defeats.

The behaviour of the Juntas was one cause of the poor performance of the Spanish armies.

To represent the often irrational behaviour of the Juntas, each turn a card is drawn from a normal 52 card deck for each Spanish general player/army commander. If the card is a 2 through to a 10 no exceptional instructions are issued by the Junta that turn. If a face card is drawn (Knave, Queen, King, Ace) then an order is given to that general with which he must comply. The four suits - Hearts, Diamonds, Clubs, Spades - represent a lowering gradation of events from good to bad while the value of the card - Knave, Queen, King, Ace - represents an increasing gradation of events from moderate to extreme. The orders of the Juntas are therefore not always bad, but they will often be disruptive.

By surrounding himself with like-minded supporters and clever manipulation of the populace in Zaragosa, Brigadier General José de Palafox was able to effectively set himself up as a petty dictator and have his cronies appoint him as Capitan General of Aragon Province. He will not submit to orders from a Junta (one was not even convened in Aragon) until the Central Junta came into session in September 1808 and when they refused to recognise his authority stating that no properly appointed civil administration had promoted him, he merely grabbed a few of his mates and made then the Aragon Junta.

By controlling the valuable silk and glazed ceramic tile markets, and hence the bulk of taxable income in the province, the city of Valencia was also able to send into the field armed forces led by General Pedro Gonzales de Llamas whom the Junta was not able to control.

The Palafox and Llamas players will not have any Junta cards drawn for them.

6.0 Time and Motion

6.1 Map Turns

Each turn on the map is 2 weeks. Turn 1 is Early June, turn 2 is Late June, turn 3 is Early July and so on.

6.2 Winter Movement

Military campaigning is generally considered difficult-to-impractical during the winter months (late November to early February inclusive) and the rains make roads difficult during these months, reducing all movement by half and preventing any off-road movement by artillery. Rivers are swollen and cannot be used for transporting siege trains. Military forces that remain halted in a settlement of town size or larger do not suffer attrition. A military force that is not in a town or city, whether it moves or not, will have an average dice rolled for each brigade with 2 deducted from the roll giving a possible result of 0 to 3. This is the percentage losses that brigade suffers from attrition due to campaigning in winter, that turn.

Note that when winter movement halves all march distances, the bonuses and penalties for terrain and nationalities are also halved. When calculating moves in winter, including across rivers, apply all bonuses and penalties to the normal move distance, then divide by 2.

6.3 Movement Distances

Forces containing infantry may march 12 hexes by road
Forces containing infantry may march 8 hexes off road on low-lying land
Forces containing infantry may march 6 hexes off road on higher ground

Forces containing artillery may march 10 hexes by road
Forces containing artillery may march 6 hexes off road on low-lying land
Forces containing artillery may not move across higher ground

Forces containing only cavalry may march 14 hexes by road
Forces containing only cavalry may march 10 hexes off road on low-lying land
Forces containing any cavalry may march 4 hexes off road on higher ground

All Spanish forces deduct 1 hex from these move rates.

All French forces add 1 hex to these movement rates.

6.3.1 Messengers and Intercepting Dispatches

Messenger/ship communications can be achieved in one turn over any distance unless an enemy supply line must be crossed when on a 1 in 3 chance, the message will be intercepted.

On land, messengers will travel by road, taking the shortest distance to their destination.

6.4 Siege Trains

These are limited to 1 per nation (Britain/Portugal counting as one) and at times a nation will not have one at all. At the start of the game, no army has an effective siege train. News of where suitable cannon and powder stores are to be found will be advised by the umpire during play.

6.4.1 Map Movement

Siege trains may only move strategically by river and will move in one turn from their depot to their destination providing that friendly troops are at the destination. They may move a very short distance from a river to the nearest fortress they are required to be employed against in the next turn. Rivers may not be used for siege train movement during November through to February.

6.5 Rivers on the Strategic Map and Battlefields

6.5.1 Strategic Map

Significant military forces take time to cross the major rivers (those marked on the campaign map). A British, French or post-June 1809 Portuguese force of division size or greater will deduct 1 hex of movement when it crosses a river. Pre-July 1809 Portuguese or Spanish forces, or forces with a Pre-July 1809 Portuguese or Spanish contingent of at least division size, deduct 2 hexes. Note that major rivers can still only be crossed where roads intersect them. It is now possible to trap an enemy against a river if an attacker is moving along a road and an opposing force is avoiding battle and attempting to retreat with a river at his back. This may create significant tactical problems for the trapped force.

Note that forces of less than division size are unaffected.

The pre-July 1809/post-June 1809 watershed for the Portuguese represents the time when the British training regime takes effect.

6.5.2 Battlefields

In SoW games it is easy to get large forces across uncrossable rivers by means of the fords and bridges provided on our digital battlefields because the game takes no account of baggage wagons, delays caused when units intermingle, inevitable confusion during retreats, and so on. In reality a significant water barrier behind an army that was defeated or obliged to attempt a withdrawal in the face of a pursuer could become a significant problem (e.g. Berezina, Leipzig).

To represent this the following rules apply:

6.5.2.1

All ammunition wagons of such a force are considered lost and will not be represented for 1 month.

6.5.2.2

All units will have their ammunition halved for 1 month.

After this time replacement wagons and ammunition are assumed to be available providing the army in question is in supply at that point.

6.5.2.3

Losses will be additionally inficted in the win/lose ratio calculator after the battle (using Hay's carry over software) in the same way that losses are increased when the winner has allocated a fresh light cavalry brigade to a pursuit role (see rule 8.7). These losses represent men drowned while attempting to swim the water obstacle or captured before they can cross. The effect of a fresh light cavalry pursuit and a water obstacle are cumulative.

6.5.2.4

A dice is rolled for each brigade and battery. For brigades a result of '1' causes it to suffer a critical morale and cohesion failure and it will be unavailable for any combat for 1 month. For batteries a result of '1' causes it to suffer the loss of 1d6 guns tipped into the river to ease congestion.

An SoW MP game may end with a retreating force "safely across" however the above rules and losses will be applied post-battle for future campaign actions.

7.0 Sieges

Note: These rules are very simple. Consider them a work in progress. Comments and suggestions to improve them are welcome. They are based on the premise that without a siege train, Peninsular fortresses could usually not be stormed and could hold out as long as food lasted and disease didn't weaken the garrison too much. Also that, once a proper siege train was employed by the attackers, a breach and assault usually followed quickly.

7.1 Types of Siege

There are two types of siege. Investment and Besieging.

7.1.1 Investment

Any force may invest a fortress which will cut any supply line it generates unless the garrison chooses immediately to sally and wins the resulting battle, or drives the investing force away. A fortress-city that is invested will hold out for 1dA turns before capitulating.

Certain strong fortress-cities are Zaragosa, Gerona, Pamplona, San Sebastian and Burgos and these will hold out for 1dA +1 turns before capitulating.

Barcelona, Gibraltar, Tarragona, Valencia and Cádiz can also be supported by supplies brought by sea; they can hold out for 1dA +2 turns before capitulating, if the Allies are the defenders.

Fortress-towns will hold out for 1dA -1 turns.

7.1.2 Besieging

Only a force that has a Siege Train may Besiege a fortress and 1 turn after a Siege Train arrives at an Invested fortress, the fortress will be breached and called upon to surrender. If the defenders surrender they may march out with honours of war and withdraw to either Toulouse (if French), Lisbon (if Anglo-Portuguese) or their provincial capital if Spanish. If the defenders refuse to capitulate the fortress is stormed, with both sides rolling 2d6 and adding the result to the total number of infantry battalions and artillery batteries each contains. If the defender wins, the attacker's storming action is driven back and the siege resumes with the besieger free to either attempt to storm the defences again next turn or to maintain the siege and starve the defenders out. If the attackers win the entire garrison is captured. Casualties to both sides will be calculated by rolling an average dice (2-3-3-4-4-5 instead of 1-2-3-4-5-6) and multiplying its score by 5 to get the percentage of the troops lost (infantry in the case of the attacker, all troops in the case of the defender).

7.1.3 Ratio of Defenders to Attackers' Strength

A defending force must be a minimum of 1/5th the strength of the besieging force. If it is less the besiegers may conduct a surprise assault after 1 turn even without a breach or siege train. The defenders will always lose such combats and be captured. The defenders lose 1dA (average dice) x 10% of their strength, the attackers 1dA x 5% of their strength.

Alternatively the besiegers may call upon the too-weak garrison to surrender immediately, allowing it to march out with honours of war (see rule 7.1.2)

7.1.4 Combats in Fortresses that have less than the Minimum Garrison

Reference rule 2.5

These will capitulate after 1 turn if the Investing force is at least four times greater or has a Siege Train. If the Investing force is weaker the Investing player may fight the battle as an MP game using one of the town maps from SoW or alternatively demand the surrender of the fortress and if accepted the defenders march out with honours of war (see rule 7.1.2).

7.2 Losses During Sieges

Whether Investing or Besieging, both the attacker and defender will suffer 1d6 x 2% of its ORIGINAL STRENGTH per turn (every 2 weeks). If a force's strength should fall to below 50% of its original numbers it will lift the siege and withdraw (if the attacker) or surrender (if the defender).

8.0 Battles

8.1 Zone of Control

Each force on the map has a Zone of Control (ZoC) around it that covers the six adjacent hexes. A wholly cavalry force has an extra 1 hex of ZoC directly along a road down which it is moving. If a force enters the ZoC of an enemy force it must halt. The two force commanders are then advised of enemy strengths and compositions with accuracy of information dependent on the disparity between force sizes and cavalry strengths. If both agree to fight, a battle is set up using SoW NapMod MP.

8.2 Retreat Before Battle

If one force declines to fight it must withdraw out of the enemy ZoC which may pursue if it has sufficient move allowance remaining. A battle may thus be forced upon one side even though it wishes to avoid one. In this case an MP scenario is set up that makes it difficult for the avoiding side to fully escape battle by placing the attacker partly across his line of retreat and in extremely close proximity. If an attacker cannot force the reluctant side to battle during the MP scenario, the latter should at least be pushed away from his line of retreat and/or suffer at least some casualties while escaping.

8.3 Cavalry Extra ZoC

Note that cavalry extra 1 hex frontal ZoC can cause an enemy force to stop while the cavalry force manoeuvres aside for the remainder of its movement allowance.

8.4 Maps Used for SoW MP Battles

Certain SoW maps will be used to represent towns, river crossings, fortifications, thick forest and specific hilly areas but otherwise more generic random maps will be used to cover most low-lying farmland terrain.

Towns = Gettysburg, Sharpsburg, Burkittsville, Fredericksburg, Myersville/Union Mills, Littlestown, Manchester, etc
Rivers = Antietam (Potomac or Antietam Creek), Salem Church Map (Rappahannock River), Culp's Hill and Macpherson Ridge maps (Rock Creek), Pipe Creek Maps (various)
Fortifications = Salem Church, Culp's Hill
Thick Forest = Chancellorsville, Fox's gap, Culp's Hill
Severe Hills = Culp's Hill, Round Tops, Crampton's Gap, Fox's gap, Pipe Creek (various)

The umpire will select the most representative map to use to resolve the first battle in that hex. Subsequent battles in that hex will use the same map in the same orientation.

Battles won and lost contribute to overall campaign victory. Casulaties are calculated using Hays Campaign Battle and Casualty Tool. A loser must withdraw at least half and up to his full road move distance away from the victorious enemy unless a city or fortress is to his rear when he may fall back into it and stop.

8.5 Information of Enemy Forces Prior to Battle

For each light cavalry squadron: 2 pts
For each dragoon squadron: 1 pt
For each light infantry battalion: 1 pt
For each battle that commander has previously fought: 1 pt
For each battle that commander has previously won: 1 pt

Result:

2x more points than enemy - advice about how many corps, divisions and brigades enemy has, plus guns&men +/- 10% accuracy
(1,2 = -10% accurate; 3,4 = accurate; 5,6 +10% accurate)

More points than enemy - advice about how many corps and divisions and brigades enemy has, plus guns&men +/- 20% accuracy
(1 = -20% accurate; 2 = -10% accurate; 3,4 = accurate; 5 +10% accurate; 6 +20% accurate)

Fewer points than enemy - advice about how many corps and divisions enemy has, plus guns&men +/- 30% accuracy
(1 = -30% accurate; 2 = -20% accurate; 3 = -10% accurate; 4,5 = accurate; 6 +10% accurate; 7 +20% accurate; 8 +30% accurate)

2x fewer points than enemy - advice about how many corps and divisions enemy has, plus guns&men +/- 40% accuracy
(1 = -40% accurate; 2 = -30% accurate; 3 = -20% accurate; 4 = -10% accurate; 5,6 = accurate; 7 +10% accurate; 8 +20% accurate; 9 +30% accurate; 10 +40% accurate)

8.6 Forces Adjacent to Battle

Any force within the ZoC of another force that is the attacker or defender in a battle, may join in that battle. It will be placed near the edge of the battle map in the MP scenario in a position that agrees with its line of march from its map location.

The umpire may stipulate that it may not move for a certain period of time to represent delays in arriving.

8.7 Light Cavalry Reserves

Prior to the SoW MP scenario being created, a commander may elect to keep in reserve a force of light cavalry which is removed from the OOB and plays no role in the MP battle. Such a reserve must be at least 4 squadrons and have a brigade commander. If a player elects to do this and wins the battle, far higher losses from wounded and deserters and from those units that routed or were captured in the MP game will be applied to the losing side in the post-battle casualty carryover calculation, the assumption being that these were taken prisoner in the pursuit. Exact numbers will depend on the individual battle but the benefit will be significant. If the side with the reserve loses the fight a small bonus will be applied to the post-battle casualty calculations to represent a strong rearguard covering the retreat.

Both sides (without prior knowledge) may elect to take this option. In such cases cavalry reserves will cancel each other out unless one has a significant edge in numbers and/or quality over their opponent.

9.0 General Intelligence of the Enemy

The length of each map turn (2 weeks) means that news of some enemy movements will be known quite quickly and almost all movements will be known about after a delay, thus at the start of the game, all enemy field force locations and approximate strengths will be known as well as significant garrisons to both sides. After this, movements will generally become known no later than 2 turns after they occur and some within 1 turn.

Each enemy movement that occurs within one map move of friendly forces has a dice rolled for it. On a 4, 5 or 6 the movement is known about that turn. On a roll of 1, 2 or 3, the movement is known about next turn.

Each enemy movement that occurs beyond one map move of friendly forces has a dice rolled for it. On a 4, 5 or 6 the movement is known about on the next turn. On a roll of 1, 2 or 3, the movement is known about after 2 turns (1 month).

RESOURCES

Wikipedia's general page of the Peninsular War - pretty good basic coverage of the whole five years. This is all you need to read to get playing in the game.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peninsular_War

An excellent general resource for the Peninsular War, extremely well put together and covering just about every event imaginable. You can search for battles, generals, towns, campaigns. I have found it indispensible for quickly filling gaps in the information I have in books to make up the gaame OOBs and gather generals names.

http://www.peninsular-resource.com/

A useful Wikipedia page about Junot's march into Portugal in 1807 also covering some of the political background as to why everything kicked off.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Invasion_of_Portugal_%281807%29

Here is a good online resource stating the chaotic and poor state of both Spain's and Portugal's armies in 1807-1808. It gives a good idea of the social and political mess Spain was in at the time as well, giving a good idea why her armies were so ineffective.

http://www.reenactor.ru/ARH/PDF/Nafziger.pdf

Here is a map showing Spain's provinces which are vital to her politics at this period.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ae/Peninsular_War.jpg

A fascinating and detailed history dissertation covering Gibraltar throughout the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars. There's lots in here that bears upon our campaign.

Gibraltar in the Napoleonic Wars

An account of the action at Bruc or Bruch in June 1808 when the French first encountered warfare against an enemy who would not fight. This is a useful guide to give a sense of how effective teh guerillas could be.

Battle of Bruc

A useful website of old European maps and prints. They are mostly from the early 20th C but you can get a good idea of old town and port layouts and the terrain around the places of interest. I've linked to the Spanish section, you can zoom in and printscreen the map pages in enough detail for our purposes.

Old Maps of Spain

RULE CHANGELOG 19 FEB 15

19 February 2015

Under rule 2.4.2 (Open Cities Listing), Malaga is added:

"Malaga - Andalucia (also a port) 26.41"

It was previously classed as a town. It has been deleted from the towns list. It remains a port.

Please update your maps by marking Malaga with a red dot.

RULE CHANGELOG 26 JAN 15

26 January 2015

Under Rule 2.4 the Settlement List, Bilbao is corrected as being a port. It was previously shown as just an open town.

Rule 1.2 Settlements is amended by the addition of Villages/Minor Towns to the map key:

"1.2 Map Legend

Black-outlined white diamond = Village or Minor Town"

Rule 2.1.3 is added:

"2.1.3 Villages and Minor Towns

Black-outlined white diamonds represent small settlements of insignificant military or taxable value such as hamlets, villages or small towns. They do not need garrisons. They do not provide sufficient resources and overhead cover to afford troops protection from the elements during winter and forces located in them may suffer attrition.

Their presence on the map often occurs at river crossings and road junctions and their primary purpose is to aid players in issuing orders and other instructions - giving better clarity of orientation."

These remarks are for clarity only, no functionality is changed.

RULE CHANGELOG 25 JAN 15

25 January 2015

A clarification to how Rule 6.2 'Winter Movement' is applied. The following is added to the end of Rule 6.2:

"Note that when winter movement halves all march distances, the bonuses and penalties for terrain and nationalities are also halved. When calculating moves in winter, including across rivers, apply all bonuses and penalties to the normal move distance, then divide by 2."

RULE CHANGELOG 31 DEC 14

31 December 2014

Amended rule 6.2 Winter Movement:

6.2 Winter Movement

Military campaigning is generally considered difficult-to-impractical during the winter months (late November to early February inclusive) - however it did happen. Rains make roads difficult during these months, reducing all movement by half and preventing any off-road movement by artillery. Rivers are swollen and cannot be used for transporting siege trains. Siege trains cannot be moved during winter. Military forces that remain halted in a settlement of town size or larger (villages do not count) do not suffer attrition. A military force that moves however will have an average dice rolled for each brigade with 2 deducted from the roll giving a possible result of 0 to 4. This is the percentage losses that brigade suffers from attrition due to campaigning in winter, that turn.

RULE CHANGELOG 22 OCT 14

Added rule 6.5 "Rivers on the Strategic Map and Battlefields" in order to make water barriers behind a retreating force a potential cause of greater losses in the event of a defeat.

RULE CHANGELOG 4 SEPT 14

Added special rule 2.5.3 for Toledo.
Deleted players list (outdated)

RULE CHANGELOG 13 JULY 14

Added new map with additional rivers.
Spanish team can see new map with secondary roads.
Added secondary roads to map legend (1.2)
Updated Settlement List (2.4) to current status Early July 1808
Added to Effect of Supply Lines (3.1) "In battles expended ammunition will not be replaced and stragglers returning after battles (mainly from routed and captured units) will be fewer for a force that is out of supply."
Made some grammatical clarifications to Map Movement Distances (6.3)

RULE CHANGELOG 16 JULY 13

Added rule Light Cavalry Reserves (8.7)
Adjusted siege rules to reduce siege times (7.1.1)
Adjusted siege rules to use an Average Die instead of a normal 1d6 (2-3-3-4-4-5 instead of 1-2-3-4-5-6) (7.1.1)

RULE CHANGELOG 24 APRIL 13

Map: Moved fortress-town of Rosas to hex 61.10. It remains a port.
Added provincial Juntas rule (5.1)
Clarified Investment rule (7.1.1)
Clarified ratio of Defenders’ to Attackers’ strength in sieges (7.1.3)
Added Forces Adjacent to Battle rule (8.6)
Rule 8.5.1 general intelligence of the enemy renumbered (9.0)
Added resource peninsular-resource.com

RULE CHANGELOG 23 APRIL 13

Added rule numbers to the settlement list (2.4)
Barcelona designated fortress-city (2.4.3)
Bayonne, Perpignan and Rosas designated fortress-towns, and Rosas a port (2.4.4)
Algarve - 2 port-towns added, Faro and Lagos. (2.4.5)
Introduced two sizes of fortress - towns and cities. Fortresses must now have a minimum sized garrison to be effectively held (2.5)
Added a clarification to the Depots rule. Depots must be placed in settlements (3.2.1)
Added French LoC rule (3.5)
Bonus/Penalty for winning/losing a campaign season reduced from 20% to 10% (4.1)
Deleted all off-road movement ability for artillery in mountains (6.3)
Introduced defenders to attackers strength ratio for sieges rule (7.1.3)
Introduced minimum garrison rule for fortresses (7.1.4)
Renumbered several rules.


Last edited by Mr. Digby on Fri May 01, 2015 6:59 pm; edited 40 times in total

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Tue May 14, 2013 8:45 pm

Added a link in the resources section of the rules to a very well-written and fascinating history dissertation on Gibraltar.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Sat May 18, 2013 4:20 pm

I have added a much larger version of the map - at 160% size - it is the same map but I added numerous minor settlements. These have only the function of allowing more descriptive map locations for troop destinations and discussions between generals. They will probably appear on the maps we fight battles on as a reference point.

Link is in the first post next to the original map.

Warning, the file is 6.7 Mb

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Grog on Sat May 18, 2013 6:44 pm

Great Idea, Martin

It will also help with map counters. More detail and text possibilities.
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Tue Jul 16, 2013 3:31 pm

I've changed the Investment rules (sieges, not banking!) since I have read that sieges in the Peninsular were often of quite short duration. Only rarely did places hold out for months and these reduced times should encourage armies to besiege/invest fortresses more. A good way to get a place to capitulate quickly is still to throw a huge force at it and so outnumber its defenders over 5 to 1.

I added a new rule for light cavalry reserves in MP battles. I think its quite a neat rule as it removes some units from the OOB (lowering game strain), it could be used to get around our 10-sqn brigades problem and it could help to get us some of the more crushing defeats/routs that were so common in the war when a side lost and was pursued by the enemy's cavalry if it was fresh. In terms of setting aside a reserve I am willing to tweak/adjust OOBs for the French and British but for the less flexible Spanish whole existing brigades of the minimum strength must be used.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Sun Jul 13, 2014 7:30 pm

13th July 2014

I've made some changes to the campaign map. I thought there were some roads lacking in a couple of places and some quite significant towns were shown only as my additional villages.

Villages that have been redesignated towns:

Alcaniz, 47.17
Teruel, 43.20
Reynosa, 25.05
Taboa, 09.20
Almaden, 23.30
Llerena, 18.32
Algeciras, 20.44

Villages that have been redesignated fortress towns:

Tarifa, 19.45

Tarifa was a particular problem for the French when they were besieging Cadiz and it was never captured so I think it needs to have a fortification.

Roads added:

Road from Carcassone thru Pamiers, in France.
A short road in 34.24 that links Zancara to the Montalbo road.
A coast road from Malaga south-west towards Gibraltar that joins the Ronda road in 21.43.
A small network of roads to connect Algeciras and Tarifa to the Gibraltar-Cadiz highway.

I have added some minor rivers:

Rio Mijares which reaches the sea at Villareal, 47.23
Rio Palancia which reaches the sea at Saguntum, 46.24
Rio Calarreona which reaches the sea west of Aguilas, 38.38
Rio Andaraz which reaches the sea at Almeria, 35.41
Rio Odiel which reaches the sea west of Huelva, 12.37
Rio Lima which reaches the sea at Vianna in northern Portugal, 06.12
Rio Orbigo that runs from the hills near Puebla de Senabria, 15.11, to meet the Rio Esla just south of Benavente, 20.11.

I have named all rivers on the map, which should help players plan their moves, and me when reporting back.

Lastly I have introduced a new class of road; "Secondary Roads". These are shown by broken brown lines on the map and are initially known only to the Spanish players. French players whose troops pass through a hex containing one will be informed of it, and where it (probably) leads. I've written a rule to cover them.

I added minor roads because I thought there were a few significant empty parts of the map which would never be used and some areas had poor links to other areas, which I think would seriously channel the campaign movements later on (the map, though good is very much Wellingtons-campaigns-centric); reading the history of the campaigns in Spain, it was clear that armies did pass through these regions. However I made the use of them quite problematic so players will have to consider carefully if it is worth using one.

Secondary Roads

These are indicated on the map with a broken brown line.

Forces moving along them do so at road speed but -1 additional hex in addition to any other penalties (national, seasonal).

Artillery units moving along Minor Roads suffer a -2 hex penalty to movement.

Supply Lines may be drawn along a Minor Road but in order to do so a unit (of any type) must be stationed at each end of the road where it joins a Major Road. In addition both Allied and French forces must occupy any town-sized settlement along the road with 1 infantry battalion or dragoon squadron.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Mon Aug 18, 2014 6:42 pm

A question was asked today and the answer applies to everyone:

Is it possible to amend and elaborate on orders already given or is there a limit of one batch a turn?

No, you can attempt to adjust your orders indefinitely depending on what news trickles in via either letters or newspaper reports. I say "attempt" because I have a clock running that is tied to how many messengers you send and receive - each takes about 2 days to get there and back, sometimes more depending on a variable factor and I keep a tally of how much time has elapsed in the 2 week turn. You can issue whole new orders on the last day if you want, your troops just won't get very far.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Thu Sep 04, 2014 1:43 am

4th September 2014

Added a special rule 2.5.3 to cover the unique geography of Toledo, both the Alcazar citadel and fortified nature of the single bridge over the Tagus, the Puente de Alacantara.

To clarify: Any unit of any type and size is sufficient when placed at the junction of a secondary road, to allow a supply route to then be drawn down that road. Note that to allow supply along secondary roads a unit is needed at each end plus a unit in any town-sized settlement along the seconary road's length.

To clarify: Supply routes follow a military force like the tail of a tadpole following it's head. You cannot send a force along one road and route it's supply path via another road.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Wed Oct 22, 2014 8:40 pm

22nd October 2014

Added rule 6.5 "Rivers on the Strategic Map and Battlefields"

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
avatar
Mr. Digby

Posts : 4902
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Wed Dec 31, 2014 2:45 pm

31 December 2014

Amended rule 6.2 Winter Movement:

6.2 Winter Movement

Military campaigning is generally considered difficult-to-impractical during the winter months (late November to early February inclusive) - however it did happen. Rains make roads difficult during these months, reducing all movement by half and preventing any off-road movement by artillery. Rivers are swollen and cannot be used for transporting siege trains. Siege trains cannot be moved during winter. Military forces that remain halted in a settlement of town size or larger (villages do not count) do not suffer attrition. A military force that moves however will have an average dice rolled for each brigade with 2 deducted from the roll giving a possible result of 0 to 4. This is the percentage losses that brigade suffers from attrition due to campaigning in winter, that turn.

==================================================

Notes: I reduced the winter season by taking off early November and late February so it's reduced by two turns. I wanted to introduce attrition during winter unless an army is in winter quarters and the new rule now covers this.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Sun Jan 25, 2015 7:24 pm

25 January 2015

A clarification to how Rule 6.2 'Winter Movement' is applied. The following is added to the end of Rule 6.2:

"Note that when winter movement halves all march distances, the bonuses and penalties for terrain and nationalities are also halved. When calculating moves in winter, including across rivers, apply all bonuses and penalties to the normal move distance, then divide by 2."

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Mon Jan 26, 2015 3:16 pm

26 January 2015

Under Rule 2.4 the Settlement List, Bilbao is corrected as being a port. It was previously shown as just an open town.

Rule 1.2 Settlements is amended by the addition of Villages/Minor Towns to the map key:

"1.2 Map Legend

Black-outlined white diamond = Village or Minor Town"

Rule 2.1.3 is added:

"2.1.3 Villages and Minor Towns

Black-outlined white diamonds represent small settlements of insignificant military or taxable value such as hamlets, villages or small towns. They do not need garrisons. They do not provide sufficient resources and overhead cover to afford troops protection from the elements during winter and forces located in them may suffer attrition.

Their presence on the map often occurs at river crossings and road junctions and their primary purpose is to aid players in issuing orders and other instructions - giving better clarity of orientation."

These changes are for clarity only, no functionality is changed.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Thu Feb 19, 2015 11:57 am

19 February 2015

Under rule 2.4.2 (Open Cities Listing), Malaga is added:

"Malaga - Andalucia (also a port) 26.41"

It was previously classed as a town. It has been deleted from the towns list. It remains a port.

Please update your maps by marking Malaga with a red spot.

Rationale: Recent research has revealed that Malaga was one of the six largest settlements in Spain in the early 1800s.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Fri Feb 20, 2015 3:34 pm

20 February 2015

I have found a map error in the area of the road between Burgos and Valladolid. I had Villadrigo marked west of the Carrion/Pisuerga confluence and Duenas marked east of it astride the Pisuerga. Mike/Grog pointed out this to me and I have issued a 'patch' (get it?) for the map. Please copy/paste this patch onto the map as it will fit exactly.

Duenas is now SW of the Carrion/Pisuerga confluence and the small town astride the Pisuerga to the east is Torquemada.

Thanks all


_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Wed Mar 04, 2015 10:32 pm

I have combined a few recent map updates into a new master map.

Malaga is now a city.

Error over naming of Villadrigo/Torquemada fixed at 27.11.

New village Torrelavega added at 26.04.

Error with river names now fixed. Rio Carrion is corrected to Rio Pisuerga. Rio Pisuerga is corrected to Rio Arlanzon. These are around Burgos/Valladolid/Reynosa.

Link is in the first post, near the top. Note Allied commanders have access to a slightly different version in the Allies private forum.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Fri Mar 13, 2015 7:59 pm

13 March 2015

Added a link in the resources section for the June 1808 battle of Bruc (or Bruch). Good reading to get an idea of what it was like facing a guerilla force with a traditional Napoleonic army.

The period maps in the article give a good sense of typical Catalonian terrain.

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
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Mr. Digby

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Re: Campaign Rules

Post  Mr. Digby on Fri May 01, 2015 7:00 pm

1 May 2015

In the resources section I added a link to a nice website of old European maps. They are a bit modern for our era but are old enough to get a good idea of the town/city/port layouts and especially the surrounding terrain.

Old Maps of Spain

_________________
The other Martin - Charles Reille, le dernier Maréchal de France.

"Any hussar who has not got himself killed by the age of 30 is a jackass." - Antoine Charles Louis Lasalle, commander of Napoleon's light cavalry, killed in battle at Wagram 6 July 1809, aged 34.

"I had forgotten there was an objective." - Generallieutenant Mikhail Borozdin I
avatar
Mr. Digby

Posts : 4902
Join date : 2012-02-14
Age : 58
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